LANDMARKS

2012

  • January 5: MHA states that it does not have direct evidence of the KMSS having any kind of nexus with the CPI-Maoist in the anti-dam protest as alleged by the State Government.
  • January 6: P Chidambaram says peace agreements have been signed by the Government with Gorkha Janmukti Morcha in West Bengal, UPDS in Assam and again it was on the verge of concluding another agreement with at least two groups in Assam.
  • January 9: Shambhu Singh, Joint Secretary (North East) of the MHA, said that the MHA has already taken a decision that a major crackdown should be launched to check the menace of extortion. Singh said that the death of senior CPI-Maoist leader Mallojula Koteswara Rao alias Kishanji must have affected the move of the Maoists to establish stronghold in the region. He said that according to information available with the Government, Kishanji visited Assam and Manipur just before his death in West Bengal.
  • January 9: Intelligence agencies reportedly receive inputs that the CPI-Maoist has sought the help of Assam based insurgent group, KLO, indicating a retaliation of an "unprecedented scale" to avenge the killing of its politburo member Mallojula Koteswara Rao alias Kishanji in West Bengal on November 24, 2011. A senior Police official said they have received inputs that "something big" would happen anytime, anywhere. Reports said that ground-level intelligence gathered by Central agencies revealed that top Maoist leadership has been constantly interacting with KLO in the last one month.
  • January 12: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi said that nine insurgent groups on ceasefire agreements with the Government would surrender before the Republic Day (January 26). These groups consist of ACMA, BCF, AANLA, KLA, KRA, UKDA, HPC, STF and ACF.
  • January 12: UPDS tells P. Chidambaram that it's MoS with Central and State Government has failed. UPDS 'chairman' Longsodar Senar wrote to Chidambaram saying, "As the Assam government has wilfully refused to honour your solemn commitment of 'neutral administration' till the election and "level playing field" during the election, the now ex-UPDS leaders and cadres can no longer be expected to hold on to a failed experiment."
  • January 12: Tarun Gogoi said that the CPI-Maoists had formed a 'Mega Dam Resistance Forum' and influencing the anti-dam agitation at Lower Subansiri.
  • January 12: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi said that peace accord with DHD-N has not yet been singed due to the outfit's demand to include 96 villages of Nagaon and Cachar district in the greater DATC.
  • January 13: APA extends the ceasefire with State Government but refused to lay down weapons. APA 'commander-in-chief' Uday Tisku in this regard said, "We don't want to lay down arms, but want a "double-lock" system for keeping our weapons. We also want three designated camps and other facilities for our cadres. Our previous ceasefire period was to expire on January 14 but we have extended our ceasefire period for the next six months."
  • January 13: According to DHD-N supremo Dilip Nunisa, "Instead of demanding all Dimasa-inhabited areas lying in these districts and also in Nagaland, which was our earlier stance, only some adjacent areas, where the Dimasa people are a majority, should be amalgamated with the present Dima Hasao district. If the government can give away land to Bangladesh without any question, why can't they include our villages in the council?" Earlier, Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi on January 12 said that peace accord with DHD-N has not yet been singed due to the outfit's demand to include 96 villages of Nagaon and Cachar district in the greater DATC.
  • January 13: APA extends the ceasefire with State Government but refuses to lay down weapons. APA 'commander-in-chief' Uday Tisku in this regard said, "We don't want to lay down arms, but want a "double-lock" system for keeping our weapons. We also want three designated camps and other facilities for our cadres. Our previous ceasefire period was to expire on January 14 but we have extended our ceasefire period for the next six months."
  • January 15: A media report states that Paresh Baruah would expel ULFA Chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa and other senior leaders and Central Committee of the outfit permanently to start afresh the armed struggle. Further, Senior ULFA-ATF, Drishti Rajkhowa alias Manoj Rabha and Bijay Das alias Bijay Chinese would now act as the overall Commander of Lower and Upper Assam region respectively.
  • January 18: Five Moran organizations, including the All Assam Moran Students’ Union (AAMSU) and those representing women, take a pledge at the end of a huge rally at Chaliha Nagar playground in Tinsukia to carry forward their movement for self rule and the status of ST ‘at any cost’ and by ‘all possible means’.
  • January 18: Nine militant groups will lay down arms on 26 January, reports The Assam Tribune. The groups include Adivasi Cobra Militants of Assam, Birsa Commando Force, Santhal Tiger Force, Adivasi People’s Army, Adivasi National Liberation Army, Hmar People’s Convention, Kuki Liberation Army, Kuki Revolutionary Army and United Kuki Defence Army.
  • January 18: The Centre announces extension of ceasefire pacts with Dima Halam Daogah (DHD)-J faction and National Democratic Front of Bodoland (Progressive). An agreement of Suspension of Operation is signed between the Centre and DHD for a period of six months till June 30, 2012. The agreement with NDFB(P) is valid upto June 2012.
  • January 19: During the Home Secretary level meeting between the two countries, Myanmar assures India that steps would be taken against the Northeastern militants using its territory.
  • January 19: Myanmar seeks India's help for implementation of several road projects, which would facilitate free movement of the troops to the areas where the militants are taking shelter. Myanmar has also sought India's help in completing the trilateral highway linking India, Myanmar and Thailand.
  • January 20: The ULFA-ATF announces that henceforth all the surname of its leaders and cadres would be same and the common surname will be 'Asom'. In a statement issued to the media through e-mail, the ULFA-ATF said to replace the surnames of its members with 'Asom' was aimed at reflecting the outfit's commitment to expedite the evolution of the 'great Assamese nation' irrespective of caste, creed and religion.
  • January 21: Twelve militant outfits of the Northeast region give a call to the people to boycott the Republic Day celebrations as a mark of “resistance against Indian occupation of the region.” The joint statement is issued by the hard line faction of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA), Coordination Committee of Manipur’s seven parties (CorCom), HNLC of Meghalaya, Kamatapur Liberation Organization (KLO), National Liberation Front of Twipra (NLFT) and Tripura People’s Democratic Front (TPDF).
  • January 22: Prime Minister of Bhutan Jigme Y Thinley says in Guwahati that no camp of any militant group of the Northeast India exists in Bhutan. He further asserts that the security forces are kept on alert to foil any such future attempts to set up camp.
  • January 22: The Government of Myanmar assures India that steps would be taken against the militants using the territory of that country. At the same time, Myanmar has sought assistance from India for implementation of several major development projects. The Assam Tribune reports that the issue of presence of militants of India in Myanmar was discussed in detail in the recent Home Secretary level meeting between India and Myanmar. The presence of Paresh Baruah in Myanmar was also discussed in the meetings between the two countries. According to information available with the security agencies, Baruah, the leader of the hard line faction of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA), spends most of his time in an area bordering Myanmar and China and he frequently visits China.
  • January 22: Bhutan 'Prime Minister' Jigme Y Thinley said that there is no camp of any militant formation of the northeast in his country.
  • January 23: Fifteen former militants of the DHD have in association with Dimapur-based Naga militant outfit has formed DNRF in Dima Hasao district. The leaders of the outfit are R.J. Dimasa alias Arje Dimasa, Soten Dimasa and Jensingh Dimasa. The group's main demand is to establish a separate Dimasa kingdom.
  • January 24: 676 militants belonging to seven militant formations surrender along with 202 small and big arms at a function held at the indoor stadium inside the Sarusajai Sports Complex, in the presence of Union Home Minister P. Chidambaram and Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi. The militant outfits that surrendered were APA, AANLA, STF, UKDA, KRA, KLA and HPC-D.
  • January 26: Fifteen KPLT militants surrender before the State Hill Area Development Minister, Khorsing Engti, at KASA stadium in Karbi Anglong district.
  • January 28: Security Forces launched the first operation against CPI-Maoist in several parts of the Dhemaji district. Police said some Maoists have taken refuge in the district to carry out anti-social activities.
  • January 31: The Assam Adivasi Peace Movement, (an organization that has been approved by AANLA) said that the community (Adivasi) had lost out on the ST status and related-benefits for having been branded as either tea tribes or ex-tea tribes.
  • February 1: Following a request from Indian Government, Nepal Government starts attaching the property of Niranjan Hojai, the 'commander-in-chief' of DHD-J.
  • February 2: ULFA-ATF 'Vice Chairman' Paresh Baruah confirms his group's links with CPI-Maoist.
  • February 5: Pro-Talks faction of ULFA-PTF’s charter of demands to the Central Government include a separate Constitution on the lines of Jammu & Kashmir for Assam, an "Upper House" in the state Assembly and the setting up of a Supreme Court bench.
  • February 7: NDFB-PTF demands that future Boroland State (as projected by the outfit) should have a Legislative Assembly with as high as 90% of the total seats of the Legislative Assembly and 100% of parliamentary seats reserved only for Tribal people.
  • February 9: The Gauhati High Court extends the interim bail period of DHD-J 'chairman' Jewel Garlosa and 'commander-in-chief' Niranjan Hojai for two months more until April 9, 2012.
  • February 9: Deputy Army chief of the NDFB- PTF, B Sudem says that no cadre fled the designated camps of the NDFB-PTF as reported by some newspapers.
  • February 12: NDFB-RD is targeting Businessmen as well as Government employees having workplaces especially in central and northern parts of the State. The outfit's modus oprendi involves taking help of non-tribal girls serving the outfit as agents, who will befriend & then on that day ask the target for dinner in the bar.
  • February 14: Ex-Union Home Secretary GK Pillai expresses concern about CPI-Maoist inroads into the State and the region. Pillai also said that ethnic equations in the region might change any moment, paving the way for Maoist ideology.
  • February 14: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that Maoists activities in the State along the border with Arunachal Pradesh have added a new dimension to the security scenario of the northeast.
  • February 14: The MHA advises the State Government to adopt coordinated measures to tackle the Maoist problem that is currently at a nascent stage in Assam.
  • February 15: A delegation of the militant outfit NDFB-PTF led by its 'General Secretary' Govinda Basumatary meets Joint Secretary (Northeast), Shambhu Singh to urge to him to speed up the pace of the political negotiations.
  • February 19: HPC-D carries out a reshuffle in its executive council, the top policy-making body, and adopted a new 'constitution' of its own. Reports from its bastion at Sakerdawi in Mizoram revealed that H. Zosangbera, a frontline member of the 12-member executive council, has been named its new 'chairman'. The outfit's Assam committee has also been revamped with its 'vice-chairman' Elvis L. Hmar being appointed its 'chief' and David L. Hmar, an executive council member, being inducted as its 'secretary'.
  • February 21: DGP Jayanta Narayan Choudhury says that CPI-Maoist activity in the State has been reported in seven Districts.
  • February 21: A senior Police Official said that the Maoists have established three command centres -- near the Assam-Arunachal Pradesh, Assam-Nagaland and in Assam-West Bengal borders.He further said that the Maoist have also been sending some of the newly recruited cadres to some central Indian States for training.
  • February 23: Reports state that CPI-Maoists has designed a plan for creation of a confederation of states comprising the North East region of India, parts of Myanmar and the Sylhet area of Bangladesh and according to the plan, the states of the confederation would be created to represent smaller nationalities of the area. The CPI-Maoists have also established upper Assam, middle Assam and Lower Assam leading committees.
  • February 27: Five Adivasi militant formations - ACMA, BCF, STF, APA and AANLA - have demanded an interlocutor for them [outfits] to start peace talks with the Government, reports The Times of India. The five outfits formed an umbrella organization called ACCO to fight for the political rights of the Adivasis of the State.
  • March 2: Thousands of Bodo people at Amingaon in Kamrup (Rural) district attending a mass rally under the banner of the ABSU, vow to intensify their struggle for the creation of a separate State of Bodoland.
  • March 3: The NDFB-PTF urges the Central Government to create a separate State of Bodoland.
  • March 4: State DGP Jayanta Narayan Choudhury tells the media that reports are sent to the UMHA and the police is waiting for UMHA clearance to flush out CPI-Maoists along with Arunachal Pradesh Government from the inter-state border area.
  • March 5: The State's Home department confirms that the KPLT is responsible for the abduction of two forest officials in Karbi Anglong district on March 3. The militant outfit denies the charge.
  • March 5: Five militant outfits, including two Muslim groups, are still active in the State despite the fact that 15 militant outfits of the State have already joined the peace process, informed the State Government on this third day of the budget session. The combined strength of the five outfits is 710 to 770.
  • March 12: In reply to a written question by AGP legislator Prafulla Kumar Mahanta Forest Minister Rockybul Hussain says that 463 surrendered militants have been recruited in the State Police Force. He said that 500 surrendered militants are being taken to the Art of Living Foundation and 260 others to a Vipassana meditation centre in Bengaluru as part of a rehabilitation programme initiated by the State Government.
  • March 13: According to the figures given by the MHA, one incident of CPI-Maoist violence was recorded in Assam in 2010, and it increased to three incidents in 2011. In 2012, one incident has been recorded.

2011

  • January 9: ULFA is now not in favour of solving problems of Assam through militancy. “Militancy was not able to solve any problem in last 30 years. We want to solve the ethnic problems of Assam, so that a true democratic atmosphere will prevail where every one will be free to speak up for the safety and security of Assamese people,” said ULFA chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa, alias Rajib Rajkonwar, while interacting with local mediapersons at his Lakwa residence. Rajkhowa said no one was above the people of Assam.
  • January 9: Paresh Baruah, military chief of the ULFA, seems to be enjoying hospitality in China. His presence in the neighbouring country has been confirmed by the arrested head of United National Liberation Front (UNLF) chief RK Sanayaima alias Meghen. Meghen was arrested in December in Bihar by the National Investigation Agency (NIA), confessed during interrogation that he had met the elusive 'commander-in-chief' of ULFA during the 2010 Shanghai World Expo.
  • January 17: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi receives a formal letter from ULFA chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa expressing his outfit's willingness to hold peace talks with the government.
  • January 17: Addressing a the delegation of BNC led by BTC chief Hagrama Mohilary, Union Home Minister P. Chidambaram says that the Central Government wants the NDFB-ATF, headed by Ranjan Daimary, to abjure violence before formal talks get underway. He also states that the Central Government would like to talk to both factions of the NDFB together and not separately.
  • January 19: ULFA c-in-c Paresh Baruah contacts persons close to him over phone and makes it clear that his stand on the issue of talks with the Government remains the same and he would come for talks only if the Government of India agrees to talk on sovereignty of Assam.
  • January 20: The executive body meeting of United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) is held at a secret location in Nalbari district after about eight years. The meeting reportedly passed five resolutions including the decision to hold the general council meeting within the month of February. A high-level ULFA leader on condition of anonymity said that the ULFA leadership gathered at the Charia residence of deputy commander-in-chief Raju Barua and then left the village for a secret location. Sources further said that executive body meeting, presided over by ULFA chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa, was attended by vice-president Pradip Gogoi, deputy commander-in-chief Raju Barua, foreign secretary Sasha Choudhury, finance secretary Chitraban Hazarika, adviser Bhimkanta Burhagohain, publicity secretary, Mithinga Daimari, women wing chief Kaberi Kachari, cultural secretary Pranati Deka and executive member Anu Burhagohain. It is said that the meeting continued for more than one hour and was attended by two-thirds majority members of the executive body of the outfit.
  • January 21: ULFA’s elusive commander-in-chief Paresh Baruah rejects the peace initiative. Three videos are released by ULFA. One showed Paresh Baruah in camouflage fatigues dancing to the tune of Bihu songs along with gun totting ULFA cadres, a second one showed the ULFA commander-in-chief sitting on a cane chair flanked by a group of commanders. A third video showed about 100 armed cadres raising slogans both in Assamese and English: "We don't support the so-called talks. We want independence." "Independence is our birth right and we shall continue with our armed struggle until and unless we achieve our goal," they shouted.
  • January 23: The leaders of the pro-talk faction of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) claim that the statements of the outfit's 'commander-in-chief' are being influenced by international forces. They also demand that the elusive leader must be expelled from the central executive committee for breaching the outfit's discipline. The pro-talk ULFA group alleged that Baruah by his recent acts is trying to pose hurdles before the proposed talks, which cannot be accepted at any cost in the interest of the people of Assam.
  • January 25: The chief executive body meeting of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) which is being held at various secret locations in Nalbari district after eight years, will conclude on January 30. According to a top leader of the outfit, the ongoing executive meeting thoroughly discussed all the issues relating to the proposed peace talks with the Central Government. All the resolutions of the executive body meeting will be passed at the final sitting on January 30. The resolutions will then be made public at a press conference to be held at Nalbari thereafter.
  • January 30: The last and final executive council meeting of ULFA on peace negotiation is held at an undisclosed location in Tezpur. Top ULFA leaders to take resolution on several decisions regarding peace negotiations at this meeting. According to sources, ULFA will induct several top leaders of 709 and 109 battalion in the executive meeting.
  • January 31: A Tribunal headed by Delhi High Court judge Mukta Gupta issue notices to Nagaland and Meghalaya governments on the Centre's plea seeking its nod to extend the ban on militant outfit United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) by two more years. The tribunal is hearing the plea of the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) seeking its nod to extend the Government's notification, issued on November 27, 2010, to extend the ban by two years on the militant outfit on the ground that it has so far not abjured violence. "There is nobody present on behalf of the United Liberation Front of Asom. Thirty days time has to be given to the outfit to file their objection against the notification," the panel said. The ban, which was slapped in accordance with the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, 1967, was first imposed in 1990. Since then, the order has been re-imposed every two years.
  • February 5: ULFA 'vice-chairman' Pradip Gogoi says that there is no split in the ULFA as its 'chairman' Arabinda Rajkhowa and elusive 'commander-in-chief' Paresh Baruah are in frequent contact with each other.
  • February 5: Three ULFA leaders are reportedly arrested by Bangladeshi security forces and later handed over to the Border Security Force. Those handed over include: self–styled captain Antu Chaudang and two 'second lieutenants' Pradeep Chetia and Pranjit Saikia alias Saurav.
  • February 5: One Nagaland police constable and two suspected NSCN (U) rebels are apprehended by a team of police and Army personnel allegedly for arms smuggling. The trio Zhavito Yaputhomi (29), Tokihe Sema (30) and constable G Avishe Sema (25) are arrested from near Lahorijan on NH-39 during a joint operation.
  • February 6: ULFA leaders including ‘captain’ Antu Chaudang, ‘second lieutenant’ Pradeep Chetia and another cadre Pranjit Saikia are remanded to ten days’ police custody by the Court of Additional Chief Judicial Magistrate, Kamrup.
  • February 6: The Army apprehend one AANLA rebel and recover one .22 pistol and one magazine from his possession at Garampani Reserve Forest under Borpathar police station in Diphu. The rebel is identified as Maheswar Urang (27).
  • February 10: A seven-member coordination committee is set up to fix modalities and oversee a couple of critical aspects regarding the ULFA-Centre peace process.
  • February 21: The three Maoist rebels who were arrested from Orissa-Jharkhand border few days back are brought to Guwahati by the sleuths of special task force of Assam Police and are expected to be produced in the Court of Chief Judicial Magistrate, Kamrup. The trio identified as Aditya Bora, Singh Raj Orang and Ashik Sabar hail from Assam.
  • February 23: According to sources in the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) as told The Assam Tribune, leaders of the militant groups like UNLF and PLA of Manipur, chairman of the NSCN (K), SS Khaplang and the commander in chief of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA), Paresh Baruah among others attended meeting held in Ruili in Yunan Province of China. Sources revealed that according to information available with Indian security agencies, from the Chinese side, officials of the Public Security Bureau attended the meeting.
  • March 4: According to The Assam Tribune report, in recent times, the militant groups of the North East are becoming closer to each other in Myanmar in the interest of their own survival and most of the outfits of the region have strong bases in the Taka (Taga) area in the Sagain division of Myanmar. The recent videos of ULFA commander in chief Paresh Baruah along with his supporters, which was released to the media, were shot in the bases of the outfit in Taka.
  • March 9: The Maoist rebel groups have started making efforts to establish tactical alliance with the hard line faction of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) headed by the commander-in-chief of the outfit, Paresh Baruah. Highly-placed sources in the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) told The Assam Tribune that the Maoist rebel groups already established contacts with militant groups like the PLA of Manipur and NSCN (I-M) of Nagaland and though the Maoists have been trying to establish links with the ULFA for a long time, the efforts gathered ground in the wake of the recent developments.
  • March 10: Police arrests two persons, including Keshav Mahanta, a ULFA cadre, from Bamunimaidam area in Guwahati and recovers a pistol from his possession.
  • March 17: The hardliners of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) hit out against the leaders of the pro-talk faction and say that no one has the right to talk about the constitution of the ULFA and its ideals by staying with the enemy. The hardliners of the ULFA also said that the true feelings of the people of Assam on the demand for sovereignty would come out only through plebiscite and not by holding “Jatiya Abhibartan”.
  • March 20: The Pro-talk faction of ULFA led Arabinda Rajkhowa, decides that its cadres will not stay in designated camps like those of other outfits engaged in peace dialogues with the Government. According to ULFA ‘vice-chairman’ Pradip Gogoi, the decision is taken as the members of the central executive committee feel that staying in designated camps would further alienate the ULFA cadres from society.
  • March 25: To strengthen its organizational set-up, ULFA lifts ban on the four Pro-talks group leaders who took the lead to declare a unilateral ceasefire in June 2008. ULFA ‘chairman’ Arabinda Rajkhowa said all the four leaders, Mrinal Hazarika, Prabal Neog, Jiten Dutta and Jun Bhuyan (all from the outfits 28th battalion), would very much be a part of the peace process initiated by the central leadership.
  • April 23: ULFA leaders are given INR 40 million by the Union Government for daily expenses and to run their families. The Union Home Ministry released the first installment of financial assistance to the ULFA leaders, including 'chairman' Arabinda Rajkhowa, 'vice-president' Pradip Gogoi and others besides its cadres - totaling approximately 400. "We have disbursed the money to the ULFA through the Assam Government. The money has been given to take care of the daily expenses of ULFA members and other family requirements," a Union Home Ministry official said.
  • April 24: ULFA denounces a recent declaration by the Paresh Barua faction that all the battalions of the outfit were dissolved and there would be no battalion commander.
  • April 27: State Government decides to set up nine more designated camps in the State for the cadres of the Pro-Talk faction of ULFA, as per the directive of the Ministry of Home Affairs.
  • May 5: After a mutual agreement with the Government of India and Government of Assam, the Centre extends the SoO agreement with the UPDS for a period of six months with effect from May 5.
  • May 16: Centre’s Interlocutor P C Haldar meets representatives of Karbi National Liberation Front (KNLF) at Guwahati.
  • May 17: Union Home Minister P. Chidambaram says that Centre would start negotiations with ULFA even if its military chief, Paresh Baruah, didn't take part in the peace process. The dialogue with ULFA will begin soon after the new Assam government, led by Tarun Gogoi, assumes office. The previous government in the state, also led by Gogoi, was keen on finding an honourable solution to the Ulfa problem," said Chidambaram.
  • May 18: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that the new Congress Government in Assam would work towards finding a lasting solution to the demands raised by the ULFA and other rebel groups of the State. He said that the people gave a mandate for peace and conciliation and it is his duty to find a permanent solution with the ambit of the Constitution of India.
  • June 10: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that the pro-talk ULFA cadres would have to formally sign a ceasefire accord vowing suspension of operations, before the peace talks take a concrete shape.
  • June 14: The pro-talks faction of ULFA has asked Reboti Phukan, who has twice mediated to bring ULFA to the negotiating table in 1991 and 2006, to go to Dhaka and convince ULFA general secretary to join the peace process. Over a month ago, Delhi is understood to have requested Dhaka to give access to Chetia. Once Dhaka agreed, ULFA was told to hold consultations and agree upon a member who could visit Dhaka and convince Chetia to return.
  • June 27: The Telegraph reports that the Paresh Baruah faction of the ULFA, NSCN(K) and NDFB (anti-talk) alongwith the support of UNLF, PLA and PREPAK, have united under a single umbrella in Myanmar to creat an “independent Northeast country”. The effort is headed by SS Khaplang.
  • August 2: A three-member delegation of the NDFB (Pro-talk) faction led by its chairman, B Sunthagra and publicity secretary, S Sanjarang accompanied by BJP Lok Sabha MP Ramen Deka calls on Leader of Opposition (Lok Sabha), Sushma Swaraj to urge her to prevail upon the Centre to expedite the peace process. The spokesman of the militant outfit told that they have requested the opposition leader to raise the issue of the peace process in the Parliament.
  • August 5: ULFA hands over its charter of demands to Union Home Minister, P. Chidambaram and Assam Chief Minister, Tarun Gogoi in New Delhi. The charter, which they called ‘Framework of Charter for Negotiations to Resolve the Issues between Assam and India’, was submitted by a seven-member delegation of ULFA, led by its chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa. The 12 broad groupings under which negotiations are proposed to start are: • Grounds for ULFA’s struggle and their genuineness. • (B)Status report on missing ULFA leaders and cadres • Constitutional and Political arrangements and Reforms-including protection of the • identity and material resources of the local indigenous population of Assam. • Financial and Economic Arrangements, including settlement of all royalties on mines/minerals including oil on a retrospective compensatory basis and rights of independent use for a sustainable economic development in future. • Illegal migration-its effect/impact and required remedies including sealing of international borders, river patrolling, development of a native force to man the borders. • Ethnic issues-problems and constitutional restructuring including settlement of border disputes and removal of encroachment. • Education and Health-reforms as required to preserve the identity of the people of Assam and benefits. • Agricultural and Rural Development. • Land and Natural resources-including right of natives to the land, flood control and management • Industrial Growth-Development of infrastructure, removal of transport bottleneck, development of entrepreneurial skill and efficiency in labour, availability of credit, infusion of capital-leading to industrial take off and right to engage in specific relationship with foreign countries for promotion of mutual trade, commerce and cultural relationship. • Restoration, protection, preservation and spread of indigenous culture of Assam in all its variety. • Amnesty, re-integration and rehabilitation of ULFA members and affected people. • August 10: The Government of India has made it clear to all the militant groups talking to it that there would be no further division of Assam. Highly-placed sources in the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) tells that though several militant groups including the National Democratic Front of Boroland (P) have been demanding creation of separate states, the Government is against further division of Assam.
  • August 23: According to an estimate of the Home Ministry, there are 79 insurgent groups including splinter factions, which are active across six northeastern States. A detailed list of the militant outfits furnished by Minister of State for Home Affairs M Ramachandran in the Lok Sabha reveals that Manipur has the highest number of 50 active militant outfits in the region including 22 valley-based and 27 hill-based outfits. One militant outfit, Kangleipak Communist Party (KCP) has 12 factions, while Kuki National Front has four factions. While Assam has five active militant outfits including ULFA, NDFB, DHD, UPDS and KLO, neighbouring Meghalaya has nine insurgent outfits. In Arunachal Pradesh, apart from the two factions of NSCN, another militant outfit, National Liberation Front of Arunachal has reared its head in the State. Barring Sikkim, rest of all the northeastern States are now affected by militancy. Mizoram now has three militant groups including Hmar Peoples Convention (HPC D), Hmar National Liberation Front (HNLF) and Kamatapur Liberation Organisation (KLO). Nagaland and Tripura have six and three militant outfits respectively.
  • September 3: A tripartite agreement for suspension of operations (SoO) is signed between the central government, Assam government and the ULFA in New Delhi. The Government of India was represented by the Joint Secretary (North-East), Ministry of Home Affairs, Shambhu Singh, while Government of Assam was represented by the Home Commissioner Jishnu Barua and Addl. Director General of Police Khagen Sharma. ULFA was represented by Shashadhar Chaudhuri, Chitraban Hazarika and Raju Barua. The period for ceasefire has not been specified and the SoO would continue. ULFA has agreed to confine their cadres to the designated camps but they requested the Centre to re-christen them as ‘Naba Nirman Kendras’. The ground rules also talk about banning on collection of taxes and extortion.
  • September 23: Dimasa militant outfit, Dima Halam Daogah, decides to climb down from its demand for an autonomous state and settle for a territorial council instead. This was informed by DHD chief Dilip Nunisa, who also said that the outfit is preparing its design for the proposed territorial council that it wishes to present at the final round of talks in New Delhi by the second week of October.
  • September 25: According to media reports, quoting intelligence sources, the anti-talk ULFA chief Paresh Baruah invested millions of US dollars in several Bangladeshi companies having interests in real estate, shipping, textile, power and medical care. In a classified report, security agencies also said he receives USD 1.5 million every quarter as remittances from these businesses and an additional USD 5,00,000 every quarter through Western Money changer from other sources. The report said Baruah invested USD 14 million in three Dhaka-based real estate firms — Basundhara Real Estate, Eastern Housing Project and Jamuna Group Housing Project — in the name of one Karujjaman, a London-based businessman. In Basundhara Real Estate, Baruah invested USD seven million, which is 17 per cent of the company’s total share. While in Eastern Housing Project Baruah invested USD four million, which is nine per cent of the total share, in Jamuna Group Housing Project the ULFA leader invested USD three million, which is two per cent share of the company. The report was prepared following a three month-long investigation on Baruah’s illegal transactions and business activities in Bangladesh. Baruah, against whom an Interpol red corner notice is pending, owns 30 per cent share (USD two lakh investment) in Samrita Hospital, 30 per cent share (USD 1.7 million) in Kasem Textile, 30 per cent share (USD 2.5 million) in Chowdhury Shipping and 40 per cent share (USD one lakh) in Dhaka’s famous Chinese restaurant Wimfray in the pseudo name of Jumen, a resident of Dubai, the report said. The ULFA leader also owns 12 per cent shares (Investment of USD two lakh) in Samit Group, a power utility company in the name of Sishir Chowdhury, a Tokyo-based businessman. Baruah also owns 15 per cent share (USD 1.5 million) in One Group Dilkusha.
  • October 25: Formal round of political dialogue between ULFA and the government takes place in New Delhi. Tripartite talks were held between ULFA, the central government and the government of Assam on the basis of the charter of demands submitted by the outfit. The meeting was held under the chairmanship of Union Home Secretary RK Singh. After the talks, the Home Ministry in a formal communication stated that the Government of India representative has been requested to hold meetings with the Chief Secretary, Assam and ULFA leaders on their demands regularly. ULFA leaders told that this round of talk was limited on fixing the agenda for the political dialogue with the Government of India.
  • November 23: The anti-talk faction of the ULFA announces its new 16 member central committee headed by Dr Abhijit Barman, who will be the acting chairman, while, the commander in chief Paresh Baruah will also be the acting vice chairman of the outfit. Paresh Baruah has got the additional responsibility and his rank in the outfit has been upgraded from "colonel" to "Major General". The new committee was formed in the mobile military headquarter of the outfit. • As per the list, senior ULFA member Jiban Moran will be the assistant general secretary and acting finance secretary while, Drishti Rajkhowa and Bijoy Das will be the deputy commander in chief. Michael Deka Phukan and Partha Gogoi will be the assistant finance secretaries, while, Montu Saikia, Nayan Medhi, Salim and Azhar Ali will be the assistant organizing secretaries. Samiran Bhuyan, Sagar Topno and Jyotirmoy Bharali would be the assistant cultural secretaries and Arunodoi Dohotiya will be the assistant publicity secretary. Dr Pranmoy Asom will be the assistant foreign secretary of the outfit.
  • November 25: Karbi insurgent outfit United People’s Democratic Solidarity (UPDS) signs peace accord with the Centre and Assam Government, paving the way for restoration of peace in the troubled hill district. The Centre declared a package worth over Rs 2000 crore, while the new set-up would be rechristened as ‘Karbi Anglong Autonomous Territorial Council’ (KAATC). • The agreement was signed in the presence of Union Home Minister P Chidambaram, Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi and the visiting UPDS delegation. UPDS chairman Longsodar Senar, general secretary Haren Singh Bey and two joint secretaries, Kanjan Terang and Surya Rongphar, and self-styled C-in-C Anil Teron signed the accord, while State Home Secretary Jishnu Barua and Joint Secretary (NE) Shambhu Singh signed it on behalf of the State Government and the Centre respectively. Other top Assam government officials, including DGP Sankar Barua and Additional DG (SB) Khagen Sarma, and 16 members of the UPDS took part in the agreement-signing function. • The main points of the accord are: • 39 additional subjects will be transferred to the new Karbi Anglong Autonomous Territorial Council. • There will be a total of 50 members in the council, in which 44 will be elected and the rest six will be nominated. • The council will prepare its annual budget, and the state government will approve it. • Funds under the Central Government’s special package will be directly received by the council. • New appointments for different departments under the council will now be made by the council itself, except for a few posts. • A special economic package of Rs 350 crore over and above the Plan fund over the next five years will be provided to the council. • The UPDS has been asked to surrender their weapons and disband the militant outfit within a month in view of the approaching elections to the council. The accord, however, has proposed that rehabilitation of UPDS cadres, withdrawal of cases relating to heinous crimes shall be reviewed case by case according to existing policy for withdrawal of such cases. • The accord also proposes setting up of village councils for boosting democratic process at the grassroots level. State Finance Commission (SFC) has been proposed for consideration of higher fund allocation to the council to undertake viable activity. The Centre has inserted a clause proposing strict adherence to established norms of financial management and proper audit of the accounts. • Special measures for socio-economic, education, health and cultural development have been promised by the Centre. • Improvement of road connectivity, water supply and supply of power in Karbi Anglong district under existing schemes, besides providing one-time grant for capacity building in KAATC for preparation of DPR have also been proposed.

2010

  • January 1: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that the spontaneous participation of the people in successive polls over the years was a clear mandate against a sovereign Assam. “Discussing sovereignty is out of question, and the people have also rejected the idea. We are ready to hold talks on every other issue,” Gogoi said at a press conference.
  • January 5: Top Bodo leaders strongly condemn the killing of Leelavati Daimary, a subject teacher of Horisinga Higher Secondary School and elder sister of NDFB (anti-talk faction) chairman Ranjan Daimary.
  • January 7: Bangladesh and India will ink three key agreements, including a crucial pact to combat terrorism, during Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina’s landmark three-day tour from January 10, said Dipu Moni, the Foreign Minister of Bangladesh. “Three treaties will be signed during the visit (and) these are agreement on mutual legal assistance on criminal offences, agreement on the transfer of sentenced persons and agreement on combating international terrorism, organised crime and illegal drug trafficking,” Dipu Moni told reporters. She said the two neighbours are also set to sign a memorandum of understanding (MoU) on power swapping.
  • January 7: After 30 years of absence from service NF Railway sacks ULFA C-in-C Paresh Baruah by issuing a formal notification. He was appointed in the sports quota but he remained absent from duty since he joined the ULFA in 1979, according the Railways.
  • January 7: The ULFA reiterates that it would hold only political dialogue with the Centre on the issue of ‘sovereignty’ of Assam. Stating that talks could not be held so long as ULFA leaders were in chains, the ULFA, in the latest edition of its mouthpiece Swadhinata, criticized the ‘colonial’ government, Delhi for considering the ULFA’s willingness for political negotiations on ‘sovereign Asom’ as an weakness of the outfit and undermining the sentiments, hopes and aspirations of people of Assam through military action.
  • January 12: The State Cabinet constitutes a Cabinet Committee to study the demand for changing the nomenclature of the North Cachar Hills district. According to official sources, the Cabinet Committee comprising Dinesh Prasad Goala, Himanta Biswa Sarma and Khorsing Ingty has been directed to submit its report within 30 days.
  • January 13: On the issue of handing over top ULFA and NDFB leaders, Prime Minister of Bangladesh, Sheikh Hasina says India and Bangladesh are working on an Extradition Treaty.
  • January 13: The Government of China is yet to extend cooperation to India to prevent militant groups of the Northeast region from procuring weapons from that country, while, reports of frequent visits of the militant leaders to China has also become a matter of serious concern. Highly placed official sources told The Assam Tribune that the Government of India has took up the issue with the Chinese Government and expressed its concern over the developments. But so far, the Chinese Government has not taken any step to prevent the menace. The Government of China on the other hand has denied the fact that the militant groups are procuring weapons from that country.
  • January 13: The uncertainty surrounding the peace talks with the United Peoples’ Democratic Solidarity (UPDS) is likely to disappear by mid-February, the tentative date fixed for holding the next round of parleys with the Centre. According to a top leadership of UPDS, staying at a designated camp, it would not compromise on the four revised parameters it had framed and placed before the Government of India to facilitate signing of an accord with the Government aimed at ensuring permanent peace in Karbi Anglong district. The four basic parameters sent by the outfit are – 1. Granting self-rule in the hill district 2. Putting in place a mechanism to ensure direct funding from the Centre without any involvement of the State government 3. Control over the functioning of officers and bureaucrats in the district 4. Protection of land and natural resources.
  • January 18: India turns its focus on Myanmar to flush out the militants operating from that country as the issue is on top of the agenda of the three-day Home Secretary level talks slated to take place in Nay Pyi Taw from January 19. The two countries would be also mulling sealing of the entire 370 km of the international border in Manipur sector following pressure of the Congress-ruled State Government. Currently only 10 km of the international border in Moreh sector, is proposed to be sealed.
  • January 18: The outlawed United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) pledges that their jailed leaders would not jump parole if freed from prison to facilitate peace talks with the government. “Let me assure the government and the people of Assam that if released on parole we shall never betray the trust... we shall not flee,” jailed ULFA vice chairman Pradeep Gogoi told journalists while being taken to the Gauhati Medical College and Hospital. Gogoi’s reaction follows reports that the Assam Government was contemplating granting parole to at least eight top jailed ULFA leaders to facilitate peace talks, but New Delhi is apprehensive that the rebel leaders might jump parole and go underground.
  • January 19: In its mouthpiece Freedom the ULFA states its opinion against autonomy which, it feels, will only divide the State. The outfit hit out at the State Government for its failure to punish the “secret killers”. The ULFA mouthpiece also states that the outfit would continue to attack the BSF, CRPF, ITBP, CISF, SSB, BRO and other security forces.
  • January 24: At a three-day Home Secretary-level talks between India and Myanmar which concluded in Myanmar capital Nay Pay Taw on Thursday, Myanmar assured that its ruling junta plans to launch coordinated operations with India to flush out Northeast militants from its territories and has promised to help track down elusive ULFA ‘commander-in-chief’ Paresh Baruah, reports PTI. “Security forces of India and Myanmar will conduct coordinated operations in their respective territories in the next two-three months. The objective of the operations is that no militant can escape to the other side after facing heat in one side,” a Home Ministry official said.
  • January 27: Under pressure of the State Government, a reluctant Home Ministry is mulling framing broad guidelines for negotiations with the outlawed ULFA. According to sources, the Home Ministry is likely to convene a high-level meeting to prepare the modalities for talks. Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi is also likely to be consulted.
  • February 1: The ULFA’s general council will discuss and take a decision on the Centre’s offer of talks, arrested vice-chairman of the banned group Pradip Gogoi said. “The decision to hold talk can be taken only by members of the ULFA’s general council,” Gogoi told reporters.
  • February 1: Militants using the territory of Myanmar for years may soon face serious trouble as India and Myanmar have started the process of working out modalities for coordinated operations on both sides of the international border to trap them. The dates for launching of such operations are yet to be finalized. Highly placed official sources tells The Assam Tribune that during the recent visit of the Union Home Secretary, the Government of Myanmar agreed to launch coordinated operations to flush out the militants. However, launching of such operations on both sides of the international border would require detailed plans primarily because of the terrain, while the exact location of the camps and bases of the militants would have to be identified. Moreover, as the security forces of Myanmar have very little presence in the areas where the militants have managed to establish camps, security build up would have to be carried out for launching of such operations.
  • February 25: Chief Minister, Tarun Gogoi accompanied by the State DGP Shankar Barua holds a half-an-hour-long meeting with Union Home Minister P Chidambaram. The meeting is attended by union Home Secretary G K Pillai and Joint Secretary (North East) Navin Verma. The meeting reviews the prevailing situation in the State with the Centre and the State Government exchanging notes on the peace process with various militant groups particularly ULFA. The Centre appraised the State Government about the likely crackdown in neighbouring Myanmar soon. After the meeting, the Chief Minister told newsmen that though they have received positive indications from another group of ULFA men, Paresh Barua’s group is yet to respond. The idea is to involve a substantial number of ULFA militants in the talk process,” he said. The strategy is to wait for the crackdown in Myanmar, ULFA’s last remaining bastion abroad, after which the Government would be in a better bargaining position
  • March 4: The Centre clarifies that it has not received any formal request for peace dialogues so far at the organizational level from the ULFA. Sources in the Home Ministry has disclosed that at least one round of meeting between top officials and the ULFA leaders were held in the jail premises. The ULFA leaders have been advised to draft its charter of demands.
  • March 16: ULFA hoists a flag of the outfit on the occasion of the ‘Military Day’ of the outfit unfurled their flag near the Swahid Bedi at Mangaldai College. The flag was reportedly fluttering till 8:45 am and the police had no information on it prior to the arrival of media persons in the college.
  • March 28: According to sources, India along with Myanmar is planning a joint military action against Northeast militants.
  • March 29: According to an official statement made by the Forest Minister of Assam Rockybul Hussain, out of the active militant groups, the ULFA has a strength of 875 cadres, while the anti-talk faction of the NDFB has 225 cadres, AANLA has 30 cadres, Kuki Revolutionary Army (KRA) has 40 cadres, Hmar People's Convention- Democracy (HPC-D) has 50 cadres, MULTA has 110 cadres and Assam unit of the Harkat-ul-Mujaheedin has 45 cadres. The Minister said that two outfits, Bircha Commando Force (BCF) and Adivasi Cobra Force (ACF), are in suspension of operation with the State Government and two others- BW and KLNLF laid down arms to join the mainstream.
  • March 31: The report of the National Investigation Agency (NIA) that had probed the alleged involvement of public servants of NC Hills district in misappropriation of government funds and their criminal misconduct, is tabled at the State Assembly. In the report, the NIA noted that the funds allocated to several departments for the purpose of providing safe drinking water, roads, and social security schemes were defalcated and transferred, retarding seriously the development of NC Hills. The NIA report mentioned that the ‘benefits’ given by contractor Jayanta Kumar Ghosh to Mohit Hojai — the then chief executive member (CEM) of the NC Hills Autonomous Council (NCHAC) who was elected as CEM “on the specific instructions of Niranjan Hojai, the ‘c-in-c’ of DHD (J) in furtherance to a criminal conspiracy to fulfil the illegal demands of the terrorist outfit – included Rs 15-20 lakh for a flat in Ganeshguri (Guwahati) around a year back, about Rs 25-30 lakh at one time in 2009, and Rs 13 lakh for social welfare work. The ‘benefits’ to Prakanta Warisa by Ghosh included Rs 15-20 lakh in instalments of Rs 1-2 lakh, and Rs 10 lakh for PHE work. The ‘benefits’ to Depolal Hojai, the predecessor of Mohit Hojai, from Ghosh comprised a Ford Endeavour vehicle (Rs 20-22 lakh) in May-July-2008, a pistol in Kolkata (Rs 15 lakh) against a receipt of only Rs 1.5 lakh or Rs 70,000, a Goa-Mumbai trip before Puja 2008 and another Kashmir trip before Puja-2008, necklace etc., for Hojai’s wife, and Rs 40-50 lakh for PWD works in 2008. The report said that government funds worth crores of rupees of several departments such as PWD, PHE, Social Welfare, DRDA, Agriculture and Soil Conservation were misappropriated and pocketed by council members, government servants and contractors. “A large part of the funds also reached the DHD (J) as part of the criminal conspiracy.” The details of the arrests made and the present status in this connection are: Phojendra Hojai (on bail), Babul Kemprai (on bail), Mohit Hojai (in judicial custody), RH Khan (on bail), Jewel Garlosa (judicial custody), Ashringdao Waris (judicial custody), Samir Ahmed (judicial custody), Vanlachhana (judicial custody), Malaswmkimi (judicial custody), George Lawmthang (judicial custody), Niranjan Hojai (absconding), Jayanta Kumar Ghosh (judicial custody), Debashis Bhattacharjee (judicial custody), and Sandip Ghosh (judicial custody). The report noted that the ASDC party was elected to power in the council in 2007 in alliance with the BJP. “The ASDC had the tacit support of the DHD (J) and Depolal Hojai became the CEM. Depolal Hojai was not able to fulfil the illegal demands of the DHD (J) regarding supply of funds for procurement of arms and for carrying out the terror activities which was not liked by the DHD (J) leadership. In furtherance to the criminal conspiracy, on 26.11.08, Mohit Hojai was elected as CEM on specific instructions of Niranjan Hojai…”
  • April 2: According to an MHA statement, Manipur continues to be the hotbed of insurgency followed by Assam as 150 violent incidents have been reported in the two States in first three months of 2010, claiming 100 lives.
  • April 7: According to an official spokesman of the Ministry of Home Affairs, the Government of India decides that it will not enter into dialogue with splinter groups or any other new outfits and breakaway factions or accept their laying down of arms in a public function. Such cadres can, however, surrender as per the provisions of the Surrender-cum-Rehabilitation Policy, it was stated.
  • April 7: In Guwahati Bangladesh High Commissioner to India, Tariq Ahmed Karim said, "The world has seen our resolve to fight terrorism and India has acknowledged it at the highest level. We shall not allow any terrorist act against India to be carried out from our territory."
  • April 8: The Union Government states that it will not enter into any kind of dialogue with splinter militant groups operating in the Northeast nor accept their laying down of arms in a public function.
  • April 9: According to the State election commissioner, the overall estimated turnout was 75 per cent and repolling was ordered in 16 of the 2,685 polling stations in the 40 Bodoland Territorial Council (BTC) seats.
  • April 11: A fresh effort to get ULFA and the government to the talks table is publicly launched with an 11-member group of “conscious and concerned” citizens ready with a set of “skeletal ideas” for ratification by an-all Assam convention at Guwahati on April 24. The objective of the group is to disentangle certain contentious issues through a broad consensus at the convention, finalise the proposals and submit the same to both parties to start talks for restoration of normality by May.
  • April 11: Union Home Minister P Chidambaram said: “Our efforts are on to bring Paresh Baruah to the table for talks. However, nothing can be said with certainty so long as Paresh Baruah is at large.” Gogoi, on the other hand, has engaged his close confidante Himanta Biswa Sarma to do the spadework for peace talks with the ULFA leaders who are now in jail or on bail, intelligence sources said. According to intelligence sources, the Assam Government has already asked ULFA chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa and Vice-president Pradip Gogoi to prepare a list of their demands that are within the Constitution of India before the initiation of peace talks.
  • April 12: According to official sources, the Assam Government spends around INR 7.59 million a month for the 4,006 militant cadres who have been staying in various designated camps in the State.
  • April 19: ULFA 'commander-in-chief' Paresh Barua rejects the peace initiative taken by the newly formed Citizen's Forum. He states that the outfit would never compromise on its demand for sovereignty.
  • April 20: According to Dr Hiren Gohain, President of the Preparatory Committee for All Assam Convention for Revival of Talks between Government and the ULFA, the ULFA 'commander in chief' should wait until conditions are suitable for a meeting of the central committee in a situation free from constraints before rushing to the press.
  • April 20: The Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi in New Delhi says that the Government will not wait "indefinitely" for elusive ULFA military 'chief' Paresh Baruah to come for talks but expects "some good news" in the next few days.
  • April 21: In an e-mail to the newly floated Citizen's Forum's leader Hiren Gohain, the ULFA 'commander-in-chief' Paresh Barua says, "There is no question of talks without the issue of sovereignty on the agenda. Agreeing to hold talks without the sovereignty issue would be like surrendering to the colonial forces".
  • April 21: According to Raju Barua, the 'deputy commander-in-chief' of the ULFA, it was the central committee of the outfit that was empowered to take a decision in a free and fair atmosphere on holding peace talks with the Government of India.
  • April 22: The Union Government clarifies that no formal request for release of the ULFA leaders from jail has been received by Assam Government.
  • April 22: In an e-mail statement, Paresh Barua criticizes some intellectuals of the State for having failed to understand the ULFA's ideology.
  • April 22: The Assam Public Works (APW) criticizes Paresh Baruah for being a stumbling block to the peace process in Assam.
  • April 30: Union Home Secretary GK Pillai states that Centre is waiting for a nod from Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi to start dialogue with outlawed ULFA – with or without Paresh Barua. The discussions are on between the State Government and Central Government. “We are waiting for a response from the Chief Minister of Assam. We would be initiating the talks with or without Paresh Barua,” said Pillai. Pillai’s response also confirms that Centre has endorsed the Chief Minister’s line on holding dialogue with ULFA.
  • May 4: The steering committee formed by the April 24 Sanmilita Jatio Abhibartan (United National Convention) says that the ULFA central committee could only decide whether or not the militant outfit would sit with the Government of India for negotiation without its commander-in-chief Paresh Barua. Moreover, it is also up to the central committee of the militant outfit to take a decision on whether or not the issue of sovereignty would be there on the agenda of the outfit’s negotiation with the Union Government. He clarified that it did not necessarily mean that the issue of sovereignty should be on the agenda of discussion. But, there should not be any bar to bringing it up. Dr Gohain also said that the steering committee was not slapping any pre-condition for the negotiation. It has raised the matter of release of the arrested ULFA leaders being guided by sanity. It should not be read otherwise, he said. Besides, he said, the steering committee or the April 24 convention for that matter, had not asked for rescinding the legal process against the arrested ULFA leaders.
  • May 25: Union Home Minister P Chidambaram says that Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi would take decisions on peace talks with the ULFA — when, with whom and how— and that the Centre would extend all help towards that end. He said that security offensive would continue in full steam till the militant outfits lay down arms and surrender. He said this in Aizawl.
  • June 3: The All Bodo Students’ Union (ABSU) revives the demand for the creation of a separate state of Bodoland and submits a memorandum to the Union Home Minister, P Chidambaram in this regard. The ABSU also demand intervention of the Government of India for protection of life and property of the common people of the Bodoland Territorial Council (BTC) area.
  • June 4: The Government is awaiting a response from the banned ULFA after which the dialogue process with it may evolve, according to Union Home Secretary GK Pillai. “I understand that the governing council of the ULFA was held inside jail a few days back. They are discussing. We are awaiting a response and as the response comes the dialogue process will evolve”. “The people of Assam want a dialogue to resolve the issue. If leaders outside indulging in violence listen to the voice of Assam, they will come forward for talks,” Pillai said in an apparent indication that the government was not averse to dialogue without the group’s ‘c-in-c’ Paresh Barua.
  • June 5: Home Secretary GK Pillai says there was evidence of Maoists establishing links with insurgents in the Northeastern region. Thuingaleng Muivah, leader of the Isak-Muivah faction of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN-IM), has admitted that the Maoists had approached him. Intelligence sources said that powerful Naga separatist group helped the Maoists in arms-smuggling through Myanmar and Bangladesh. The Maoists also established links with the banned United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) and the Manipur-based People’s Liberation Army militant outfit.
  • June 6: Union Home Secretary GK Pillai says a number of top commanders and leaders of the outlawed United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) based in Bangladesh and Myanmar are expected to surrender shortly and join the peace process. "Paresh Baruah would be marginalized if he remains adamant and fails to respect the voices of the people of Assam," the home secretary said.
  • June 30: Union Home Minister P Chidambaram asserts that the detained ULFA leaders could talk with the government from the prison. “People in jail can also talk if they want to,” said the Union Home Minister in reply to a question about his recent meeting with the delegation of Sanmilita Jatiya Abhibartan (SJA) led by Dr Hiren Gohain.
  • July 1: The Centre extends the Suspension of Operation (SoO) Agreement with Dima Halam Daogah (Nunisa) (DHD-N) faction for a further period of six months till December 31. The Suspension of Operation Agreement between the Centre and the outfit expired on June 30.
  • August 3: The ceasefire pact among the Centre, State Government and militant outfit United People’s Democratic Solidarity (UPDS) is extended for six months till December 31. Tripartite talks on the demands of UPDS are continuing. The Centre appoints former Intelligence Bureau chief P C Haldar as its interlocutor for talks with UPDS.
  • August 6: The Court of the Special Judge NIA, Assam, remands the 12 accused in the NC Hills Autonomous Council scam to judicial custody till August 19. According to advocate Ashim Talukdar (who is representing Niranjan Hojai, Jewel Garlosa and Samir Ahmed in the court), 12 of the accused include his clients RH Khan, Mohit Hojai, and Thoujendra Hojai. George Langthang, Jayanta Kumar Ghosh, Sandeep Ghosh, Devasish Bhattacharjee, Maltha Kimi, are produced before the court by the authorities and Babul Kemprai who is on bail, appear before the court himself, while Samir Ahmed was not produced as he was reportedly sick. While Jewel Garlosa is lodged in the Kahilipara Special Jail (quarter no-11), the rest except Babul Kemprai are detained in the Guwahati Central Jail.
  • August 17: The pro-talk DHD (Dima Halam Daoga) faction is contemplating return to the life in jungle, says supremo of the outfit Dilip Nunisa. Talking over telephone, Nunisa said 1000 plus cadres are now busy practising martial arts, sword fighting in the four designated camps where they were housed for the last seven years. “At any moment we will pull out ourselves from the so-called peace process”, warned Nunisa.
  • August 17: Leaders of insurgent outfit KLNLF, now on ceasefire, meets UPA chairperson Sonia Gandhi in New Delhi and submits a memorandum demanding autonomy and development of the twin districts of Karbi Anglong and NC Hills. Talking to PTI over phone, Karbi Longri National Liberation Front general secretary Thong Teron described the meeting as “positive and an important political development for the two districts bringing the hope for self-rule”.
  • August 18: A KLNLF delegation meets Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.
  • August 25: Union Home Minister, P Chidambaram, calls on the groups – or factions of groups – that have stayed away from talks to give up violence and accept the offer of the Governments to hold talks.
  • August 25: The growing links between the CPI-Maoist and some of the militant outfits of the Northeast region is discussed in detail in the conference of the DGPs and IGPs of all the States held in New Delhi. According to reports, the CPI-Maoist has openly supported all the "nationality struggles" including the struggle of the ULFA. Maoists have started issuing statements supporting the cause of the ULFA and CPI-Maoist leader Koteshwar Rao alias Kishenji recently openly extended support to the ULFA in an interview.
  • August 26: A team of pro-talk ULFA visits Charaipung of Sivasagar district. Mrinal Hazarika, leader of pro-talk ULFA criticizes the State Government for its failure to protect the geographical boundary of the State.
  • August 27: Assam and Arunachal Pradesh governments decide that the bunkers erected by the Arunachal Police in the area between Charaipung and the Teok river would be removed immediately. However, both the Assam Police and Arunachal Police will jointly patrol the area. The Arunachal Police can have a patrol party in the Wanchu villages to instill confidence among the villagers and similarly, the Assam Police can have patrol party in the small tea garden areas for bringing confidence among the small tea growers, the meeting said in its resolution on the issue.
  • August 28: The Assam Government takes up with the Government of India the issue of involvement of militants belonging to the National Socialist Council of Nagalim (I-M) in creating disturbance in Assam. Assam Government Spokesman and Health Minister Himanta Biswa Sarma told The Assam Tribune that as the NSCN (I-M) is under cease-fire agreement with the Government of India, and that the ceasefire agreement with the NSCN is applicable only in Nagaland and if any member of the outfit is found to be indulging in any illegal activity, he would be treated as any other militant.
  • August 30: Civil society organizations of Dima Hasao District organized a massive rally in Haflong town demanding immediate steps by the Union Government to resolve the crisis in consultation with Dilip Nunisa faction of DHD which has been in truce since January 2003.
  • August 30: Members of the All Assam Ex-ULFA Coordination Committee threatens to take up arms in protest against the alleged Government’s failure to implement the proposed rehabilitation package for the former militants.
  • August 31: Highly placed security sources states The Assam Tribune that the security agencies recently came across information that ULFA c-in-c Raresh Barua received a visa to visit China in January 2010 for a period of six months and the visa was stamped on the Bangladeshi passport used by him in the name of Kamrul Zaman.
  • September 4: DNDF, a new militant outfit, is formed in the Dima Hasao district to protect the Dimasa community from the attacks of the non-Dimasa tribes.
  • September 12: The personnel of the Rapid Action Battalion pick up one ULFA member Tinku Sonowal and roughed him up during questioning. Security sources as well as sources close to the ULFA leaders reveal that the Rapid Action Battalion of Bangladesh launched a massive crackdown on the militants in recent times and even took action against those who provided shelter to the militants. The ULFA members, who were under pressure following the arrests of senior leaders including their chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa came under tremendous pressure following the crackdown launched by the Rapid Action Battalion and decided to return to the State as their security was at stake.
  • September 24: At a meeting of the coordination committee of former ULFA cadres is held at Nagaon in which representatives of 18 district committees participate, the former ultras states that altogether 7,642 ULFA cadres surrendered between 1997 to 2005. At the time of surrender, the Government promised to withdraw pending cases against them and give them employment opportunities, but nothing has come out of it. The peeved pro-talk ULFA cadres submitted a memorandum to the Governor in August. They demand was withdrawal of the pending cases, appointment in government jobs according to their qualifications and by considering their age or a grant of Rs 3 lakh to start new ventures for earning their livelihood.
  • September 26: According to official sources of The Assam Tribune, the Centre has not opposed the idea of granting safe passage to the ULFA members who want to come for talks. But the State government is yet to send any formal proposal to the Centre in this regard.
  • September 26: One anti-talk KLNLF cadre is killed at Napaghat under Dokmoka PS in encounter with 5th Rajputna Rifles.
  • September 26: Hari Barman, a hardcore ULFA cadre is arrested by the police at Tengaigaon under Bongaigaon PS.
  • September 27: The commander in chief of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA), Paresh Barua admits that there are differences of opinion among the members of the outfit on the issue of talks with the Government. Amidst reports of division in the ranks of the ULFA on the issue of talks, Paresh Barua today sent an email to the media claiming that there is no division in the outfit. Barua alleged that the Government of India was trying to create division in the ranks of the ULFA. The Government of India has been making such efforts since 1991 and the efforts are still continuing. According to him, having difference of opinion is nothing unusual but such differences can be settled through timely action by the chairman of the ULFA and other members of the outfit.
  • September 27: The Central Government’s interlocutor for talks with the militant groups of Assam, PC Haldar meets Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi at his residence to discuss various issues relating to the talks with the militants.
  • September 28: Central Government’s interlocutor PC Haldar meets the jailed leaders of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) in the Central jail in Guwahati for a detailed discussion on the possibility of initiating the process of talks. Three more members of the militant outfit return from Bangladesh last night bringing the number of those who came back to the State within this week to 31.
  • October 3: The National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB-P) observes the 24th foundation day of the outfit at Serfanguri designated camp. The foundation day was also observed simultaneously at Borbori designated camp in Baksa district and in Udalguri.
  • October 6: Senior leaders of the ULFA start filing bail petitions. Among the jailed central committee members of the ULFA, two are already out on bail and if the process to initiate talks with the outfit progresses as per expected lines, the other senior leaders may be bailed out in the days to come. Official sources pointed out that the Government cannot directly release the jailed leaders of the ULFA, but it can facilitate their release on bail by not opposing the bail petitions. According to reports, the deputy commander in chief of the ULFA, Raju Baruah as well as ULFA adviser Bhimkanta Buragohain alias Mama have already applied for bail, while, the cultural secretary of the outfit, Pranati Deka is likely to file bail petition.
  • October 12: Though the Assam Government is yet to receive any formal communication from the Centre on the issue of release of the jailed leaders of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA), the State Government, on its own, decides to facilitate the release of the jailed central committee members of the ULFA in phased manner by not opposing their bail petitions. According to official sources, the Assam Government has already paved the way for release of three central committee members of the ULFA—adviser Bhimkanta Buragohain, deputy commander-in-chief Raju Baruah and cultural secretary Pranati Deka by not opposing their bail petitions.
  • October 19: The National Investigation Agency (NIA) files the charge sheet in connection with its case number 02/09 registered u/s 120-B, 121, 121A IPC and u/s 16, 17, 18 and 20 of the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act relating to alleged diversion of public funds for terrorist activities in NC Hills district. The NIA had taken over the investigation corresponding to case number 03/09 U/S 120(B)/121/121A IPC registered with Diyungmukh Police Station in NC Hills. The charge sheet that was filed with the Special Court of NIA, Guwahati named 16 persons as accused, including all the 13 persons named as accused in the investigation agency’s earlier charge sheet filed in connection with NIA case number 01/09, the trial of which is pending. The names of the 16 accused include Jibangsu Paul, Golon Daulagupu, Karuna Saikia, Mohet Hojai, Md Redaul Hussain Khan, Jewel Garlosa, Ashhringdaw Warisa, Samir Ahmed, Joseph Mezo, Malsawmkimi, George Lam Thang, Niranjan Hojai, Jayanta Kumar Ghosh, Debasish Bhattacharjee, Sandip Kumar Ghosh and Phojendra Hojai. Jibangsu Paul, Karuna Saikia and Golon Daulagupu, who are only three new names have meanwhile been issued summons to appear before the Court on November 3,” informed advocate Akhil Talukdar who appeared on behalf of the accused. Moreover, the name of Babul Kemprai, one of the accused in the first NIA case has been excluded from both the charge sheets.
  • October 19: According to Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi, both the Centre and the State Government are ready for peace talks with the ULFA in December, initially with the outfit’s chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa as the government cannot wait for the ‘commander-in-chief’ of the outfit, Paresh Baruah, indefinitely. Mr Tarun Gogoi said this in Guwahati after meeting Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Union Home Minister P Chidambaram on the peace process with the ULFA.
  • October 19: In a meeting held at Amola Bhavan in Kokrajhar, the NDFB (Progressive) seeks support from the Koch Rajbongshi United Forum (KRUF), a forum of 11 different organizations of the Rajbonghsi community, for the creation of a separate state of Bodoland at a meeting in Kokrajhar. The meeting was the first of its kind between the NDFB (P) and KRUF in which a new route of cooperation and understanding between the people of the two communities was discussed.
  • October 30: A huge cache of arms and ammunition of the outlawed United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) is recovered from the Shillong Higher Secondary School in Shillong. From the seized documents, district police chief Mawthoh said, it is evidently clear that the arms and ammunition were hidden as "reserve weapons" by the ULFA militants. The weapons have been hidden by Drishti Rajkhowa, the 'second lieutenant' of ULFA, he said.
  • November 1: Union Home Minister, P Chidambaram backs Chief Minister, Tarun Gogoi stating that the latter has the liberty to decide on the timing of the talks.
  • November 1: The Deputy Chief of the Bodoland Territorial Council (BTC), Khampa Borgoyari meets the chairman of the anti-talk faction of the National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB), Ranjan Daimary, in Nagaon jail in an attempt to reduce the differences among different Bodo groups. Senior leaders of different other Bodo organizations including vice-president of the Bodo Sahitya Sabha Bisheswar Basumatary, president of the Bodo Samaj Rajen Boro, vice-president of the UDPF Pradeep Daimary and president of the Bodo People’s Forum for Peace Initiative Dr Bijoy Daimary were also present during the hour-long meeting. The BTC deputy chief spoke to the NDFB chief after more than a decade as the last meeting between the NDFB and BLT was held in Shillong in 1999.
  • November 2: ULFA commander-in-chief, Paresh Barua is trying to launch a fresh recruitment drive to increase the strength of ULFA. Highly placed police sources said that the outfit has been able to start the recruitment drive in the upper Assam districts. However, sources said that the ULFA has not been able to recruit large number of youths as was the case before.
  • November 3: The Assam Government informs the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) about the involvement of members of National Socialist Council of Nagalim (I-M) in illegal activities like extortion in the State. The matter has also been reported to the cease-fire monitoring committee involving representatives of the Central Government and the militant outfit.
  • November 4: According to Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi, the stage is set for signing of a peace accord with the UPDS.
  • November 6: The 28th battalion of the ULFA is on a recruitment drive in Jorhat, Sivasagar, Dibrugarh and Tinsukia districts. According to intelligence sources, ‘sergeant major’ Rupantar Kakoti is overseeing the recruitment drive. Sources have also revealed that the ‘area commander’ of the outfit’s Sivasagar division, Bidyut Baruah, is on an extortion spree.
  • November 7: Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi states that peace with the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) may not start in December. “We have only expressed our hope to start the peace process in December. Before the initiation of peace talks, all jailed ULFA leaders have to be released on bail, which we can’t. Though the State Government isn’t against the release of the jailed ULFA leaders on bail, it depends on the court.”
  • November 11: The outlawed ULFA and the embassy of a South Asian country are said to have paid Rs 450 crore to higher-ups of the BNP-led four-party alliance government and intelligence agencies for safe transshipment of 10 truckloads of arms seized in Chittagong in 2004. According to media reports in Bangladesh, detained former Home Minister Lutfozzaman Babar, who is on a five-day remand, gave the information during interrogation at the Malibagh head office of the Criminal Investigation Department (CID).
  • November 11: The Centre decides to launch a massive crackdown against the anti-talk faction of NDFB. Joint operations against the Bodo militant outfit are likely to be started shortly. The decision was taken at a high-level meeting chaired by Union Home Secretary GK Pillai.

2009

  • January 1: Differences within the National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB) widened with the outfit expelling former Chief Ranjan Daimary alias DR Nabla and his “associates”. In a release, president of the NDFB, B Sungthagra said that the outfit would have no link with Nabla and his accomplices. He pointed out that the recent arrest of one Ajai Basumatary and his confessional statements proved that the former NDFB chairman was involved in the serial blasts on October 30. He said that the killings were acts of terrorism and could never be parts of revolutionary struggle.
  • January 2: According to reports, the pro-talks group of the ULFA gives up the demand for sovereignty. In a press conference held at the designated camp at Kakopathar, the pro-talks group leader Mrinal Hazarika says they would now sit for talks with the Government within the framework of Indian Constitution.
  • January 6: The Centre extends the ceasefire agreement with the National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB) for a period of six months. However, the leadership of the NDFB is clearly told that the Government would be forced to withdraw it if any of NDFB members is found to be involved in violation of the ground rules of the ceasefire agreement.
  • January 10: The Assam Legislative Assembly passes the Assam Preventive Detention (Amendment) Act, 2009, increasing the detention period of any person hindering the security of the State from six months to two years. The amendment changed section 13 of the existing Assam Preventive Detention Act, 1980. The amendment stated that a State Government officer, not below the rank of secretary or district magistrate, if satisfied, could order detention of any person with a view to prevent him from acting in any manner prejudicial to the security of the state, maintenance of law and order and also maintenance of supplies and services essential to the community.
  • January 12: The Assam Government states in the Legislative Assembly that eight militant groups, including the ULFA, KLNLF, Black Widow, AANLA, KRA, HuM, MULTA and HPC-D, are active in the State.
  • January 12: The Justice P.C. Phukan Commission of Inquiry, probing the ethnic clashes between Hmars and Dimasas in the North Cachar Hills and Cachar Districts in 2003, tables its report in the State Legislative Assembly. Over 50 people had lost their lives in the conflict.
  • January 18: The Government of India approves setting up of 20 anti-terror schools in the country, of which four will be set up in the State. Director General of Bureau of Police Research and Development (BPR&D) K Kaushik told newsmen here that the Central Government, apart from providing financial support for the schools, would also arrange for specialised training which would be provided by trainers from CRPF and commando training institutes.
  • Jan 21: The pro-talk faction of ULFA suffers a setback after the desertion of a cadre on January 20. One Udayan Bharali escaped from the designated camp at Kakopathar with an AK 56 rifle to rejoin ULFA.
  • January 23: The unlawful activities (Prevention) Tribunal serves notice to National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) to show cause as to why it should not be declared as an unlawful association and why order should not be made confirming the declaration, said an official press release.
  • February 3: The UPDS rejects the new cease-fire ground rules of the Union Government objecting to the new clause that its members must surrender their arms before signing the cease-fire. The organization decides to move the Centre for its modification.

 

  • February 20: The United Liberation Front of Asom doves, the pro-talks faction of the ULFA, demands full autonomy for Assam within the framework of the Constitution. Mrinal Hazarika, president of the ULFA doves, submits an 18-point charter of demand to Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi, to resolve the insurgency problem in the state.
  • February 20: The pro-talk faction of the ULFA asserts that full autonomy alone is the answer to the growing ethnic strife and militancy. Leaders of the pro-talk faction, Mrinal Hazarika, Jiten Dutta and Prabal Neog, who submitted a memorandum to the Chief Minister, underscored the need for a change in mindset of New Delhi, saying that it needed to replace its policy of ‘coercion, intimidation and centralization’ with ‘brotherhood, coexistence and decentralization.’ Acknowledging that attaining an ‘independent Assam’ is an impossible proposition notwithstanding its ‘historical justification’, Hazarika said that the realization induced the pro-talk faction to strive for a ‘lasting political solution’ to the vexed ULFA issue within the ambit of the Constitution of India. The leaders are in favour of a federal arrangement in the country, under which the Centre would control four areas, i.e., defence, external affairs, finance and communication. “The rest are to be entrusted with the States,” they said. The pro-talk leaders sought to make it clear that apart from the indigenous populace, all those who migrated to Assam from different areas over the centuries and accepted Assam as their motherland were to be equal partners in the State’s development process. The major demands of the pro-talk group included reserving 70 per cent Assembly seats for the indigenous, forming a representative upper chamber in the Assembly, foolproof security along the Bangladesh border for thwarting infiltration, deportation of illegal Bangladeshis on the basis of the Assam Accord, updating the voters list on the basis of the citizenship register of 1951, introduction of inter-State ‘passport’ in Assam, resolving the inter-state boundary disputes, checking the perennial floods, reopening of the historic Stillwel Road and connecting Assam with South East Asia, facilitating peace talks with all militant outfits, release of the four jailed central leaders of the ULFA, raising a special task force comprising members of indigenous people for vigilance among the Bangladesh border, among others. The pro-talk faction also submitted a memorandum to the Prime Minister, highlighting the issues raised by it.

 

  • February 21: Ashok Saikia, senior vice-president of IOT Infrastructure and Energy Services Limited and son of former Chief Minister the late Hiteswar Saikia says that he is ready to act as a mediator to facilitate a ceasefire and subsequently a dialogue between the DHD (J) and the Government. This follows the outfit’s ‘role’ in the release of the four employees of a sub-contractor of the company kidnapped by a little-known ultra group, DNLF, from NC Hills on February 5. According to Saikia, the DHD (J) intervened in the matter following an appeal by him, and freed the kidnapped employees after an ‘encounter’ with the DNLF on February 19. For this ‘help’, the DHD had set four conditions, i.e., facilitating a ceasefire, amending Article 244 (A) of the Indian Constitution for creating a State within a State in NC Hills, changing the name of NC Hills to Dima Hasao Raji, and release of its arrested leader Fiphrong Dimasa.
  • March 20: National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) appeals to the Centre to lift the ban on it. “Since we entered into negotiations in 2005, we have adhered to the ceasefire ground rules. But negotiations and ban cannot go together. The ban has been extended every two years since 1992”, said NDFB General Secretary Gobinda Basumatary.

 

  • March 22: The pro-talk group of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) calls upon the people of the State to vote for the parties which can assure positive steps for the solution of the burning problems of Assam. The group makes it clear that it would not play any direct role in the ensuing Lok Sabha polls.

 

  • April 7: Union Home Minister P. Chidambaram rules out  possibility of negotiations with ULFA. “There will be no quarter taken or no quarter given. ULFA will be faught. Yes, there will be setbacks but we will fight ULFA”, he says reacting to the blasts on April 6.

 

  • April 9: Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that some opposition parties are having link with the proscribed ULFA and the rebel group is helping them in the current election.

 

  • April 28: Accprding to intelligence sources, 27-28 well trained Bangladesh Rifles men (mutineers) are imparting training to ULFA cadres along the Indo-Myanmar border.

 

  • April 30: Union Home Secretary Madhukar Gupta holds meeting in New Delhi to discuss the security situation in Assam and specially the NC Hills district. The meeting finds that a new Naga group has been operating in NC Hills. The Centre is also keeping an eye on the Naga Protection Forum.

 

  • May 3: In context of the spurt in violence in in NC Hills and Bodoland Territorial Council (BTC) areas, the pro-talk faction of the ULFA, DHD (Nunisa), Birsa Commando Force and Adivasi Cobra Militant, in a joint statement, urge all concerned to desist from fratricidal violence in the greater interest of the State and its people. “In the last 30 years the demographic pattern of Assam changed completely due to the presence of a large number of foreign nationals, threatening the identity and existence of the indigenous people. It is unfortunate that when the illegal immigrants are exercising their dominance in the elections, the indigenous groups are involved in fratricidal wars, ignoring the fact that they are on the verge of becoming minority in their own State,” the organizations stated.

 

  • May 5: Centre seeks clarification from the Assam Government on whether holding of discussions with the pro-talk faction of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) would lead to solution of the problem. Again the pro-talk faction of the ULFA warns that the failure of the Government to carry forward the peace process would strengthen the hands of the anti-talk faction of the outfit. According to The Assam Tribune the issue of holding talks with the pro-talk faction of the ULFA was thoroughly discussed in a meeting convened by the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) in New Delhi recently to discuss the law and order situation in Assam, particularly in North Cachar Hills. The State Government was of the view that the Government of India should hold talks with the pro-talk faction on the basis of the memorandum submitted by the group, while, the Centre is yet to take any decision in this regard. The Army is of the view that the members of the pro-talk faction should be treated as surrendered militants and they should be rehabilitated under the provisions of the policy formulated by the Government for the rehabilitation of the surrendered militants.

 

  • May 12: Security sources inform The Assam Tribune that the NSCN played a key role in the formation of the National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB), while the outfit also maintained links with Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) since the early 1990s. Some vital facts regarding the NDFB’s links with other outfits came out during questioning of Daimary by different agencies in the last few days. Sources said that Daimary first joined the Bodo National Front in 1983 and later in 1984, he, along with other persons including Govinda Basumatary, decided to form the Boro Security Force and wrote to the leaders of the NSCN seeking their help. The Boro Security Force, which was later renamed as the NDFB, first started a training camp in the jungles north of Rangapara in Sonitpur district in 1988 and the NSCN provided them with some weapons and trainers. In the next year, the NDFB managed to snatch away some weapons from the forest guards and police personnel to increase its strength and the second batch was trained up in 1992. Ranjan Daimary met NSCN ((I-M) chairman Issac Swu for the first time in Kathmandu in 1993 and was sent to Bangladesh to contact some persons for procurement of sophisticated weapons. In 1996, the NDFB established contacts with a clandestine arms dealer of China and paid an amount of Rs 2 crore in advance for procuring around 2,000 sophisticated weapons. However, the security forces of Bangladesh managed to intercept two of the fishing trawlers and the NDFB received only around 400 weapons. These weapons were brought to Assam from Bangladesh through different routes through Meghalaya, Tripura and Mizoram. Sources said that the NDFB had also procured weapons from the ULFA. Sources revealed that Daimary also stayed in the bases of the NSCN in Thailand for quite some time and established contacts with some agents of the ISI in 1993. The ISI provided the NDFB with some communication equipment, explosives and timer devices. Daimary even met a few senior persons of the Pakistan High Commission in Dhaka in 2004 and he knew some officials of the DGFI, the intelligence agency of Bangladesh. The CBI, which probed into the serial blasts and named Daimary as the prime accused in the charge sheet, would seek his custody to question him. CBI sources said that 19 persons including Daimary were named in the charge sheet and seven are already in jail, while, one John is now in charge of the NDFB camp in Myanmar.

 

  • May 13: Sergeant Major B Barbai of Boroland Army (Ranajan Daimary group) in a release issued to the press at Udalguri says, “The National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB) has been fighting for the liberation of Boroland and Boro people for the last 22 years. The NDFB will continue to fight for the liberation of Boroland for the right to national self-determination and independence of the Boro people till it achieves the goal. No surrender, no retreat.”
  • May 13: In a meeting convened by the district administration at Haflong Circuit house, people from all section and community unanimously decide to raise their voice against the bloodshed. According to the Deputy Commissioner the district administration has initiated confidence building measures through organizing peace meets and consultative meetings with the representatives of all the communities to restore peace and normalcy in the violence hit hills district.
  • May 13: The Greater Guwahati Dimasa Kachari Association, Dimasa Students’ Community (Guwahati), All Dimasa Students’ Union and Dimasa People’s Council jointly organize a sit-in demonstration at Dispur Last Gate against the recent violence in NC Hills district. The organisations call upon Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi to take the necessary steps to bring back peace and normalcy in the hills district.

 

  • May 23: Voluntary organisation Majuli Island Protection and Development Council (MIPADC) opposes the proposed move of the State Government to develop the Majuli sub-divisional jail into a special jail for the militants of the State. The State Government has reportedly proposed to transform the sub-divisional jail at Garamur in the river island into a special one in line with the United State-run prison at Guantamo Bay in Cuba, alleged the voluntary organisation.

 

  • May 25: Union Home Minister, P Chidambaram issues a stern warning to the DHD (J) militants, stating that the challenge thrown at the State would be met. “The DHD (J) has thrown a challenge to the State, the state with a big S. “We will respond to the challenge,” he said.
  • May 25: The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) files chargesheet in connection with the October 30 serial blasts in Assam in the Court of Special Judicial Magistrate (CBI). According to The Assam Tribune sources, as many as 19 accused have been named in the chargesheet against six cases filed under different police stations of the State. Out of those who are charge sheeted, five have been detained and 14 are absconding. NDFB Chief Ranjan Daimary's name also appears among the list of absconding.

 

  • May 26: A high level Central team headed by the Special Secretary (Internal security) of the MHA arrives Assam to review the situation in NC Hills district.

 

  • May 27: A high level Central team holds discussions with the Government of Assam to ensure best possible use of the available forces to ensure smooth running of trains in the NC Hills. About 67 companies of forces are now operating in the North Cachar Hills district.

 

  • May 31:  Crackdown against terrorists in the North Cachar hills district of Assam begins and the government is adopting a twin strategy to block the sources of funds to the ultras and annihilate them. The Assam government suspends the North Cachar Hills Autonomous Council (NCHAC) after the arrest of the council’s chief executive member (CEM) Mohet Hojai for alleged links with separatist outfits. The District Council was suspended and the administration had been brought under the control of Assam Governor Shiv Charan Mathur, which was ‘’equivalent’’ to the President’s rule in the Autonomous District Council. Army and Para-Military forces have fanned out to the interior areas to liquidate the terrorists.
  • June 4: Senior DHD(J) leader Niranjan Hojai would be the next chairman of the outlawed militant outfit, according to sources of The Sentinel. Niranjan Hojai is a nephew of arrested NC Hills Autonomous Council CEM Mohit Hojai.

 

  • June 6: DGP Assam Police GM Srivastava discloses that the DHD (J) is trying to shift its base to Bangladesh and its self-styled foreign secretary Frankey Dimasa, who was killed in the city recently, went to Bangladesh and met NDFB chief Ranjan Daimary, who promised to provide camping facilities for around 30 DHD (J) leaders.
  • July 20: More than 12,000 people displaced by the ethnic clashes in North Cachar Hills district are still living in relief camps and the violence claimed 63 lives since March this year. This is disclosed by Forest Minister Rockybul Hussain in response to a zero hour question by Dr Aditya Langthasa (AUDF) in the State Assembly.
  • July 22: Union Minister of State for Home Affairs, M. Ramachandran says in Rajya Sabha that commander-in-chief of ULFA, Paresh Baruah may have moved out of Bangladesh for some time.
  • July 22: Union Home Minister, P Chidambaram says in the Lok Sabha that the DHD(J) may soon lay down arms to come forward for talks with the Government.
  • July 29: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that the DHD(J) has expressed its desire to come forward for talks but the Government will take the final decision in this regard with consultation with the centre.
  • Aug 2: KLNLF publicity secretary Rezek Bera says that the outfit has set September deadline for the Centre to hold peace talks with it, failing which, the rebel group will attack government officials and hindi-speaking people from October.
  • August 9: Official sources say that DHD(J) is likely to come forward for talks with the Government by August 15 by following the preconditions set by the Central and State Government. The militant outfit is in touch with the Government and has already submitted a list of its weapons.
  • August 10: In an article published in the new edition of the website of the China International Institute for Strategic Studies (CIISS), a Chinese strategist contends that Beijing should break up India into 20-30 independent states with the help of “friendly countries” like Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan. In particular, the article asks Beijing to support the United Liberation Front of Assam (ULFA) for it to achieve independence for Assam from India.
  • August 11: The Suspension of Operation agreement between the UPDS and the Centre is extended for another six months period up to January 31, 2010 at a tripartite meeting among representatives of the militant outfit, Centre and the Assam government held at New Delhi.
  • August 17: In the Conference of Chief Ministers on internal security, held at New Delhi, the Prime Minister says that Assam and Manipur account for most of the violent incidents reported from the Northeast, with Manipur’s share being 30 per cent. He also describes the situation in Assam, Manipur and Nagaland as worrisome.
  • August 17: In the Conference of Chief Ministers on internal security, held at New Delhi, the Prime Minister says that in Assam, the Centre had sanctioned Rs.750 crore for development of the bodo areas but the utilization of these funds have been unsatisfactory.
  • August 17: Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says at the Conference of Chief Ministers on internal security, held at New Delhi, that at present Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Myanmar have posed as a challenge to the internal security of the state. He also says that the unholy nexus that exists between ULFA, NDFB and the fundamentalists elements of Bangladesh who have their common mentor in a foreign intelligence agency, is adding a new dimension to the internal security scenario of the State. He says that the States which share international border with Myanmar — Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur and Mizoram — are used by the ULFA and the DHD(J) for their movement as well as arms transhipment into the State.
  • August 17: The Central and the state government are not willing to go ahead with talks with the DHD(J) unless the entire leadership of the outfit is present.
  • August 19: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that Pakistan-based terror outfit Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) may target the state.
  • August 20: Highly placed police sources say that Guwahati city has become a favoured destination of the members of the Northeast militant groups and the militant groups of the state always aim to target the city to gain maximum mileage.
  • August 20: The pro-talk faction of ULFA urges for immediate talks with Dispur to move forward with the peace process, as the cadres are getting restless waiting for more than a year for the talks to begin.
  • August 22: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that proper utilization of funds in all government projects in the state will be evaluated by non-governmental agencies apart from the government agencies.
  • August 23: According to police sources, KLNLF is ready to deposit arms before the Assam police in order to enter into a ceasefire with the government.
  • August 25: According to a Home department source, Centre has decided to invite the pro-talk ULFA faction for talks.
  • August 25: Bhutan assures India that it would not allow the militant groups like ULFA and NDFB to re-establish their bases in their country.
  • August 28: Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi holds a meeting of the Unified Command Structure at Dispur on N.C.Hills situation.
  • August 29: Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi reviews the situation in the N.C.Hills district at a meeting with top officials of the district, army and the CRPF at Haflong. In a recent press meet in Guwahati, Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi had set four preconditions for the DHD-J for ceasefire with the Government. The preconditions are the outfit should deposit its arms, give up extortion drives, its leaders and cadres should stay in the designated camps and the top leaders of the outfit should take part in any peace talks with the Government. The DHD-J is yet to make its decision public on the preconditions set by the Chief Minister.
  • August 30: The Centre asks the State Government to prepare a roadmap to ensure restoration of peace in North Cachar Hills district and the same will be discussed in a meeting to be chaired by the Union Home Minister P Chidambaram in New Delhi on September 1.
  • August 31: The National Investigation Agency (NIA), probing terror-related cases involving DHD-J, traces links of dealers supplying arms to the insurgent outfits to countries like Myanmar and Malaysia.
  • September 1: Centre gives DHD-J ultimatum till September 15 to formally surrender after fulfilling all the pre-conditions. The pre-conditions are surrendering all their weapons, shifting to designated camps, putting a halt to all extortion drives and sending their top leaders for talks. This is decided in a meeting held in New Delhi, chaired by Union Home Minister P.Chidambaram and attended by Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi, Chief of the Army Staff General Deepak Kapoor, National Security Advisor M.K.Narayanan, Union Home Secretary G.K.Pillai, Assam Chief Secretary P.C.Sarma, DGP Assam Police Shankar Barua and DGPs of Para-military forces.
  • September 11: The United People’s Democratic Solidarity (UPDS) agree to deposit all its arms. This is decided in a joint monitoring group meeting held at the Special Branch headquarters in Kahilipara in Guwahati. UPDS is in a ceasefire with the government since 2002.
  • September 12: Bangladesh says that ULFA leader Anup Chetia, living in prison in Bangladesh, cannot be extradited to India as the proposed bilateral deal with India for exchange of prisoners cover only those who are serving jail terms. Anup Chetia has already completed his jail term, though he is still held in the prisons by the authorities.
  • September 16: Centre decides to hold a separate conference of DGPs of the North eastern region in Shillong on October 26, 2009. The decision to this effect is taken at the 3-day meet of DGPs and IGPs held in New Delhi from 14-16 September.
  • September 20: The Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) decides to establish a fully computerized regional coordination mechanism with its hub in Guwahati to improve coordination between police and security forces to deal with the problem of militancy.
  • September 24: Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says in a press meet in Guwahati that the surrender of DHD-J is a positive sign for the state and NC Hills in particular. He also says that the state government would release a special development package for NC Hills and Karbi Anglong, the worst-effected districts due to militant activities. He also assured recruitment of the surrendered DHD-J militants to two battalions through a special recruitment drive.
  • September 30: Union Home Minister P. Chidambaram says that he is unaware of the charter of demands of the ‘A’ and ‘C’ Companies of the 28th Battalion of the ULFA. He also clarified that the Centre is going to talk only with the entire group and not hold dialogues with separate factions.
  • October 1: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says that ULFA is trying to regroup and the anti-talk faction of the NDFB is still a threat to the state.
  • October 7: Home Secretaries and inspector-generals of police (Intelligence) of the Northeastern states will meet in Guwahati on October 9 to review the threat from insurgents and firm up an adequate response.
  • October 13: The strategy group of the Unified Command decides to intensify operations against militants belonging to the anti-talk faction of the National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB) following the recent killing of 12 innocent persons by the members of the outfit in Bhimajuli area of Sonitpur district.
  • October 14: Bangladesh says it has directed its law enforcement agencies to keep a vigil to resist any kind of ‘subversive’ activities by ULFA in that country. According to State Minister for Home Shamsul Haq Tuku, the recent activities by the ULFA were part of conspiracy against the country and the Government will uproot them.
  • October 14: According to Union Home Secretary GK Pillai, there is nothing new about militant leaders visiting China or other countries. Anyone can visit China as a tourist by procuring a visa. Such visits do not pose a threat to India.
  • October 14: Union Home Minister P. Chdambaram says that amendment to the Armed Forces (special Powers) Act is finalized. “We have made it clear that insurgent groups in the Northeast have to give up the demand for secessionism and lay down their arms and then only we will talk to them”, he said.
  • October 18: The Assam Government constitutes a high level committee headed by the Additional Director General of Police (Special Branch) to examine the credentials of the militants who want to surrender. This move is aimed at checking the menace of “fake surrenders”, highly placed official sources said. The screening committee is comprised of the Joint Director of the SIB as well as representatives from the Army, Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) and the Border Security Force (BSF).
  • Oct 20: After a period of 16 long months, the North Frontier (NF) Railway resumes operation of the Barak Valley Express and Cachar Express, regular trains running between Silchar and Lumding. Both the express trains were cancelled following regular attacks by Dimasa militants.
  • October 22: The People’s Committee for Peace Initiatives, Assam decides to revive the ULFA-Centre peace process with the help of AICC general secretary Rahul Gandhi. The committee will send a delegation to Delhi in November 2009, according to Birinchi Neog, PCPIA Coordinator.
  • October 29: The Central government initiates the first round of formal talks with the pro-talk faction of the outlawed United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA). Leaders of the pro-talk ULFA faction held nearly an hour-long meeting with Assistant Director of Intelligence Bureau RN Ravi at a secret location in Guwahati. Three leaders of the pro-talk faction - Mrinal Hazarika, Prabal Neog and Jiten Dutta - participated in the meet.
  • October 30: Government of India appoints former intelligence Bureau (IB) director P.C. Haldar as interlocutor for talks with three Northeast militant outfits - Dima Halam Daogah (Jewel), United People’s Democratic Solidarity and the pro-talks faction of National Democratic Front of Boroland.
  • November 2: Dima Halam Daugh (DHD) leader Dilip Nunisa tells media that tripartite talks held in New Delhi October 22, 2009 including DHD (N), Assam and Central government ended with promising result, where the government and DHD (N) on principle agreed to meet the demands of the organization within the ambit of the Indian constitution.
  • November 9: The dawn-to-dusk Assam bandh called by the banned United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) passes of peacefully, evoking mixed response. The outfit called the bandh in 'protest' against the arrest of two of its top leaders, Sasha Choudhury and Chitraban Hazarika.
  • November 17: The National Investigation Agency submits a chargesheet against 14 persons, including a woman, in the case involving diversion of public money to an insurgent outfit in NC Hills. Those named in the chargesheet are Phajendra Hojai, Babul Kemprai, Mohit Hojai, RH Khan, Jewel Garlosa, Ashringdaw Warissa, Samir Ahmed, Vanlal Chhana, Malsawmkima, George Lawmthang, Niranjan Hojai, Jayanta Ghosh, Debasish Bhattacharya and Sandip Ghosh.
  • November 19: Former Intelligence Bureau chief P.C. Haldar, appointed by the central government as interlocutor for advancing talks with separatist groups, arrives Guwahati to hold discussion with the State government.
  • November 21: The Central Government assures safe passage for ULFA chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa and C-in-C Paresh Baruah if the top leaders of the outfit come forward for talks without any preconditions. The National Security Adviser (NSA) MK Narayanan discussed the issue of ULFA talks with noted writer Mamoni Raisom Goswami on October 2009. He had made it clear that though the Indian Government was willing for talks with the ULFA, there couldn't be any preconditions. The sources said that the Government is of the view that the ULFA leaders and cadres based in India are willing to negotiate, however, the outfit's leaders based in Bangladesh are being manipulated by external forces to avoid talks.
  • November 23: United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa condemns the blasts in Nalbari town and says that the blasts are aimed at derailing the peace process. In a statement sent to the media, the ULFA chairman said that the blasts were triggered off by the enemies of the indigenous people of Assam. He called upon all concerned including the militant outfits to desist from killing innocent people and asked the authorities concerned to pay adequate compensation to the families of those killed. He also demanded that the authorities concerned should provide treatment to those injured in the blasts.
  • November 23: Former DGP, Assam GM Srivastava says that the ULFA is using ‘trap twin blasts’ tactic in recent Nalbari blast, a tactic used frequently by the militants in Jammu and Kashmir, while, the Maoist groups also use the tactic quite often to target security forces.
  • November 24: Union Home Minister P Chidambaram expresses in Rajya Sabha that the Centre is doubtful about the top ULFA leaders’ willingness for negotiations. This is based on intelligence inputs, recent statements made by top leaders and incidents of violence indulged by the outfits. The Centre is willing to look into the demands if the insurgents give up violence, arms and demand for sovereignty, he says clearing the Centre’s position. The Centre will continue to maintain sustained pressure to ensure that they give up violence. Chidambaram also confirms that the Nalbari blast on November 22 was the handiwork of ULFA.
  • November 24: The Home Minister says that the Centre is working with the Government of Assam to see if the A and C companies of ULFA could be brought to negotiations. The stand is markedly different from his earlier statement when he had insisted that the Government of India was not interested in talking with separate factions of the same outfit. Stating that the Government of India was currently engaged in talks with the pro-talk faction of the NDFB, he says the Centre was also willing to look into the demands of the anti-talk faction if they give up violence and arms.
  • November 25: The Central government confirms reports of insurgents in North-east procuring Chinese weapons through smugglers located in South East Asia and in Yunnan province of China. Minister of State for Home Affairs M Ramachandran’s statement in Rajya Sabha in reply to a question by Prakash Javadekar is confirmation of reports that top ULFA leadership, besides the NSCN, being involved in gunrunning racket.
  • December 1: Bangladesh and India finalize the drafts of three major agreements to enhance formal bilateral collaboration against law-breakers of either country. GK Pillai and Abdus Sobhan Sikder finalized the drafts of agreements on Mutual Legal Assistance on Criminal Matters, Transfer of Sentenced Persons and Combating International Terrorism, Organized Crime and Illicit Drug Trafficking.
  • December 2: Union Home Minister P Chidambaram states in the Rajya Sabha that the Government of India is expecting the outlawed ULFA to make a political statement on the issue of holding talks in the next few days. Barring Commander-in-Chief Paresh Baruah and Jibon Moran, India has managed to lay its hands on all other central committee members.
  • December 2: Union Home Minister P Chidambaram states in the Rajya Sabha that he would respond within 72 hours if the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) decides to hold talks with the government.
  • December 3: Central executive members of the ULFA including Pradeep Gogoi and Mithinga Daimary rule out any possibility of peace talks without Paresh Baruah.
  • December 3: Chances of United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) commander-in-chief Paresh Baruah coming for talks by accepting the pre-conditions laid down by the Government seems remote as the militant leader calls up Hiranya Saikia, a member of the People’s Consultative Group (PCG) to assert that the struggle for sovereignty of Assam would continue. Saikia confirmed the phone call and said that the ULFA C -in-C was very assertive. “He said that if any member of the outfit gives up the demand for sovereignty and come for talks with the Government they are free to do so. He also asserted that he would not give up the demand and ideology of the outfit and is ready to continue the struggle for which more than 11,000 youths laid down their lives”.
  • December 11: The Bodoland People’s Front (BPF) raise demand for a separate Bodoland State in the State Assembly. Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi, rejected the demand outright. The stand of the State Government was also supported by the AGP.
  • December 11: A large number of Ulfa cadres, mostly supporters of the outfit’s chairman, Arabinda Rajkhowa, desert their camps in Myanmar and start moving towards Assam. “A few cadres have already got in touch our sources, if not directly with us,” a senior police official said, adding that the development took place after the arrest of Arabinda Rajkhowa. It was because of such a development that a “fight” broke out between two groups of Ulfa cadres in a camp along the Indo-Myanmar border on Monday. A senior cadre of the outfit, Seema Bora, died while another woman member, Satyama Bailung, was injured after a militant fired at them. Seema was from Ujani Konwar village, the ancestral village of Rajkhowa, in Sivasagar district.
  • December 13: The United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) tendered a public apology and sought forgiveness for triggering an explosion at the Independence Day parade ground in Dhemaji in 2004 that killed 14 people, mostly children and women. “We have now realized that our statement of disowning the blast (in 2004) was not true, and hence we seek an apology from the people of Assam. The Dhemaji explosion is a dark chapter in our freedom struggle and till today we are deeply anguished,” ULFA ‘commander-in-chief’ Paresh Baruah said in a statement e-mailed to The Sentinel today. The rebel leader admitted that the ULFA leadership was being misled by some of their cadres and junior leaders about the blast. “At that time, those who triggered the blast told our leadership that it was a handiwork of government forces. We believed them and issued a statement saying the ULFA was not involved in that bomb blast,” the rebel leader’s statement said.
  • December 16: The North Cachar Hill Autonomous Council (NCHAC) is disqualified by the State Government on the ground that the Council had been formed on December 15 without any approval from the State Chief Secretary. The NCHAC was formed with Samarjit Haflongbar as Chief Executive Member (CEM).
  • December 17: Bhutan says it has no information about ULFA running any camp in the country but would take “positive steps” only if India communicated to it on this issue.
  • December 30: The People’s Committee for Peace Initiatives in Assam (PCPIA), an umbrella body of 28 different organizations of Assam, decides to hold citizens’ meets in all the district headquarters of Assam to mobilize public opinion in favour of political dialogues for solution of the issues raised by the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA). The chief coordinator of the PCPIA, Dilip Patgiri said that the process of holding of citizens’ meets is likely to be completed by January, which will be followed by a state level convention.

2008

  • January 31: A six-member delegation of the DHD led by its Chairman Dilip Nunisa held parleys with Union Home Minister Shivraj Patil to end the stalemate in the ongoing peace talks. Nunisa renewed the demand for carving out a Dimaraji state out of North Cachar Hills and Karbi Anglong districts of Assam and Dimapur district in Nagaland.
  • February 22: Central Government extends the ceasefire with Assam's Karbi Anglong-based militant outfit United People's Democratic Solidarity (UPDS) for another six months till July 31, 2008.
  • March 5: In order to bring insurgency and violence under control in Bodoland area, Hagrama Mohilary, chief of BTC appealed to Ranjan Daimary, chief of NDFB to come for talks with him in the greater interest of peace in the region.
  • March 24: The Black Widow declared a unilateral cease-fire for a period of three months.
  • March 29: The Sentinel reported that a new militant outfit, identified as Bodoland Royal Tigers Force, has been formed in the Bodoland area.
  • March 31: The chief of the Bodoland Territorial Council (BTC), Hagrama Mohilary, withdrew his talks offer to Ranjan Daimary, ‘chief’ of the NDFB.
  • April 2: Justice (Retd) R K Manisana Singh Commission of Inquiry into the November 24, 2007 Beltola incident has said in its report that there was a prima facie case of conspiracy amongst some of the Adivasis at the instigation of the AANLA (All Adivasi National Liberation Army) behind that incident. The State Government tabled the report of the Commission before the State Assembly.
  • April 5: The Dima Halam Daogah (DHD) called upon the Central and State Governments to expedite the peace process and to come out with a proposal for the political solution of the problems as soon as possible. As reported in The Assam Tribune, the chairman of the DHD, Dilip Nunisa said that the cadres of the outfit are frustrated over the delay in solution of the problems through peaceful means. He pointed out that a series of talks were held between the Government and the DHD since 2003, but till date, no solution is in sight.
  • April 7: The United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) reiterated the demand for a plebiscite on the issue of sovereignty of Assam and said that both the Government of India and the ULFA should be ready to accept the result of the same. In a statement released to the media through e-mail on the occasion of the foundation day of the ULFA, the Chairman of the outfit, Arabinda Rajkhowa said that there are two ways of resolving the conflict and one of those is a plebiscite and the second is holding of political dialogues on the issue of sovereignty of Assam.
  • April 7: Flags of the underground ULFA were reportedly found flying in separate places in upper Assam districts on the occasion of the raising day of the banned outfit. The ULFA hoisted its flag at Niz Khaloi Gugura ME school campus, on a tree in the same village under Sepon PS and Lakhwa in Sivasagar district. ULFA flags were also seen flying in Borhula Gaon under Panitola PS in Tinsukia district. All flags were later seized by the police.
  • April 11: Union Government rejected the demand of the UPDS for a Karbi state in a meeting with six UPDS leaders. The UPDS leaders said it could join hands with the DHD factions to prepare a common set of demands.
  • April 18: Minister of State for Industry Ashwini Kumar told reporters that the government is prepared to hold talks with the ULFA but it should be within the framework of the Constitution.
  • May 1: The National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB) formally submitted a memorandum to the Prime Minister enlisting its demands to start the process of political dialogues with the Government of India. In a release, the information and publicity secretary of the outfit, S Sanjarangs said that the memorandum was a reflection of the Bodo people’s historical rights, the long-cherished hopes and aspirations as well as the principles and ideology of the NDFB. The memorandum was handed over to officials of the Government of India by a team led by the general secretary of the NDFB, Govinda Basumatary.
  • May 19: Black Widow lifts ban on the work of the East-West railway corridor and gauge conversion projects in the North Cachar Hills district.
  • June 11: According to ANI report, in a tripartite meeting of the representatives of the Union Government, Government of Assam and NDFB held in New Delhi on May 30 it is agreed that Suspension of Operations will be extended for three months, up to August 31, 2008.
  • June 23: In a tripartite meeting at New Delhi the Central Govt. extends its Suspension of Operation agreement with the DHD for another six months. The agreement which was due to expire on June 30 has now been extended till December 31, 2008.
  • June 23: Assam Government asks Police to restrain from any unilateral action against the ULFA as that could hamper peace efforts with the outfit’s 28th battalion.
  • June 24: The ‘28th Battalion’ (A and C companies) of the ULFA announce a unilateral cease-fire. In a statement distributed at Chapakhowa in the Tinsukia district after a meeting of the militants at Amarpur in Sadiya, they said, "In the interest of a peace dialogue between ULFA and the Government, we desire discussions to sort out the problems of Assam. To facilitate a congenial atmosphere for the talks, we are declaring a unilateral cease-fire from June 24, 2008, and we hope our gesture would result in reciprocation from the Assam Government and the Government of India. Our decision of today follows a deep desire of the people of Assam for peace talks, and we would appeal to the ULFA Central Committee and the Government of India as well as the Government of Assam to initiate peace talks immediately." The B Company of the battalion, which has about 150 cadres, was not present at the meeting.
  • June 25: Following the unilateral truce declared by the A and C companies of the ‘28th battalion’ of the ULFA, the Assam Government decides to stop operations against these two particular companies of the outfit. However, operations would continue against those elements indulging in violence.
  • June 30: Mrinal Hazarika, ‘commander of the 28th battalion’ of the ULFA, appeals to the other ‘battalions’ of the outfit to enter into a cease-fire for the sake of the people of Assam.
  • July 1: The editorial of ULFA’s mouthpiece Freedom says that the security of sovereignty of Assam was never a precondition of the group, and it was only an agenda of talks. "The security of sovereignty of Asom was never a precondition of the ULFA. It was the media that hyped the issue of sovereignty and projected it as one of our preconditions," the editorial said, adding, "For peace talks with the Government of India, the ULFA had only two preconditions — any talks with the Government of India should be held in a third country and that should be under UN mediation. We, however, dropped these two preconditions also when the PCG went to New Delhi to do the spadework for the peace process."
  • July 4: The Birsa Commando Force (BCF), under a cease-fire with the Assam Government since 2004, threatens to resort to violence in case of the Government’s failure to meet its demands. The outfit was initially demanding Scheduled Tribes status to the 70,00000 Adivasis (tribal population) living in Assam. It later started demanding a separate State for the Adivasis.
  • July 4: Assam Government offers security to the leaders and cadres of the ‘A and C companies’ of the ‘28 battalion’ of the ULFA, who had recently declared a cease-fire, similar to the kind of protection provided to surrendered militants.
  • July 5: The ULFA ‘chairman’ Arabinda Rajkhowa says the outfit will not dissolve the People’s Consultative Group constituted by it to facilitate the peace talks.
  • July 6: Nearly 150 surrendered ULFA cadres of Dibrugarh and Tinsukia gather at Chabua and urge the Union Government, Assam Government and the ULFA leadership to "look beyond their respective rigid stands and simply come forward for direct talks."
  • July 17: The NDFB threatens to pull out of the cease-fire and take to arms once again, accusing New Delhi of dragging the peace process. According to Gobinda Basumatary, general secretary of the NDFB, "The central Government appears to be insincere towards resolving our grievances and if there is no forward movement in the peace process we shall be forced to go back to the jungles".
  • July 20: Peace talks with the Union Government in the near future is not possible, says ULFA stating that it would go down fighting like the father of Naga insurgency A.Z. Phizo "rather than surrender to the Indian forces like (former Mizoram chief minister) Laldenga."
  • July 30: Report in The Assam Tribune states that the ULFA has business interests in a leading media house, the Transcom Media, in Bangladesh. Transcom Media is the publisher of the prestigious Bengali daily Prothom Alo, English daily The Daily Star, besides two periodicals. The report adds that the outfit‘s business interests are diverse – ranging from driving schools, nursing homes, hotels to garment export houses to deep-sea trawlers.
  • Aug 7: The suspension of Operation between the UPDS and the Centre is extended by six months up to January 31, 2009.
  • September 12: In an e-mail to the media, the ULFA ‘chairman’ Arabinda Rajkhowa declares ‘expulsion’ of Prabal Neog from the outfit for his alleged conspiracy in killing of Sasanka Baruah.
  • September 16: Army states that Shashankar Baruah, who was killed in the September 12 encounter with the troops in Dirak Reserve Forest Area near Margherita in the Tinsukia district, was involved in re-organisation of the ULFA.
  • September 18: A phone call threatening of serial bomb attacks across Assam is received in the police control room in Guwahati. The caller threatens to plant serial bombs in places like Guwahati, Tinsukia, Sibasagar, Diburgarh and Nagaon amongst a few other places.
  • September 25: The pro-talk faction of the DHD expresses its willingness to extend its manpower for providing security for the construction of Silchar-Lumding broad gauge railway line, particularly in the North Cachar Hills district.
  • September 29: The cease-fire group of ‘28 battalion’ of the ULFA asks Assam Government to call off army operations from Tinsukia and Dibrugarh districts of upper Assam on an "experimental basis" to give the peace process a chance.
  • September 30: The cease-fire agreement between the Union Government and the NDFB is extended by three months.
  • October 3: Assam Police states that Assamese youth are being recruited by Pakistan-based militant outfit LeT to carry out terror strikes in India.
  • October 7: The publicity secretary of KLNLF, R Dera, says that the new armed organisation known as UKNLF, has been set up solely to divide the Karbi people and it is nothing but a political conspiracy by the government before the parliamentary elections.
  • October 12: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi says his Government has decided to go for a CBI inquiry into the recent violence in the Udalguri and Darrang districts. The government will review the cease-fire agreement with the NDFB following allegations of its involvement in the recent violence.
  • October 13: According to media reports, after neutralizing two fighting wings of the ULFA, the 28 and 709 battalions, the government now has set its sights on the 109 battalion which is the logistics division of the outfit.
  • October 15: Assam Public Works (APW) claims that there are over 50,000 SIMI and HUJI members active in Assam. APW chairman Abhijit Sarma told newsmen at Guwahati.
  • October 17: According to reports, ULFA is recruiting new cadres under the ‘supervision’ of the self-styled ‘commander’ of the ‘28th Battalion’, Bijoy Chinese, and ‘Lieutenant’ Antu Saudang, in the Sivasagar, Jorhat and Golaghat districts.
  • October 21: The Government of India clarifies that it has not received any ‘formal proposal’ from ULFA for direct talks.
  • October 22: In a statement, DHD strongly condemns the serial killing, kidnapping of innocent women, civilian and DHD cadres by BW. The BW had been planning to disturb the peace process started by DHD, the DHD alleged.
  • October 26: Around 30 militants led by a self-styled ‘sergeant major’ Rafel Maradona of the ‘709th battalion’ of the ULFA declare cease-fire.
  • October 30: In an e-mail ULFA denies its hand in the serial blasts and alleged that a section of the government officials deliberately blamed the outfit to derail the possible peace process.
  • December 2: The publicity secretary of the Karbi Longri NC Hills Liberation Front (KLNLF), R Dera says that the Karbi Anglong NC Hills People’s Force (KNPF) was formed recently to bring about a rift in the community by uniting cadres of KNLF who had either deserted or surrendered. The KLNLF will welcome the new front if it was formed for the people’s welfare. It may be mentioned that the KNPF was formed a month back on Karbi-Anglong-Golaghat border by uniting deserted or surrendered KLNLF members.
  • December 4: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi confirms that the probe into the October 30 serial blasts has so far been able to establish the involvement of the ULFA and the NDFB.
  • December 15: Union Home Minister P. Chidambaram says in the Lok Sabha that the Harkat-ul-Jihad-al-Islami (HuJI) of Bangladesh has perpetrated the October 30 serial blasts in Assam in which ULFA and NDFB were also involved.
  • December 15: Possible split in the NDFB as it replaced Ranjan Daimary with B Bengpa as the Chairman of the outfit at its general assembly held at Serfanguri. Outfit’s publicity secretary S. Sanjarang says the NDFB will go ahead with peace talks with the Centre, and filed candidates in the coming Lok Sabha polls.
  • December 16: CBI formally takes over the cases relating to the serial blasts as well as the ethnic riots (Darrang and Udalguri districts).
  • December 16: The Centre clarifies that there was no dialogue with the self-styled ‘28th Battalion’ of the ULFA so far.
  • December 16: The NDFB ‘general secretary’ Gobinda Basumatary says that Ranjan Daimary has not been removed. He is the ‘commander-in-chief’ of the NDFB.
  • December 19: Bodo frontal organizations including the ex-BLT, ask the NDFB to quit Karbi Anglong within December 25. The National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB) is charged of being involved in different illegal activities.
  • December 24: The Union Government has extended the Suspension of Operations agreement with the DHD for a year till December 31, 2009. According to official sources, the extension follows a tripartite meeting among representatives of the Centre, Assam Government and the DHD.
  • December 27: In an e-mail to the media, Ranjan Daimary says: "I am still the chairman of the NDFB, and I will continue my efforts for the self-determination of the Boros. The NDFB- BLT clash is over, and as such I request the ex-BLT cadres not to target the NDFB cadres. I have also ordered the NDFB cadres not to target any ex-BLT members.
  • December 28: NDFB’s ‘publicity and information secretary’ S. Sanjarang said in a press release that B. Sungthagra alias Dhiren Boro was its ‘president’, confirming the rift within the outfit.
  • December 30: Karbi Longri NC Hills Liberation Front (KLNLF) and its armed wing KNPR declare unilateral ceasefire for two months beginning from January 1, 2009 to March 1, 2009. P Dili, chairman, KLNLF/KNPR in a press communiqué mentioned that the KLNLF does not want sovereign status or secession from India but wants Hemprak Kangthim (Self-rule) within the ambit of Indian Constitution. The outfit exhibiting good gesture urged the authority including KAAC to start the peace process within the time-frame.
  • December 31: The term of the cease-fire agreement between the Government and the NDFB expires.

2007

  • January 1: Assam Chief Minister, Tarun Gogoi, announces a safe-passage offer for all the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) cadres from January 7 to 20.
  • January 1: ULFA ‘chairman’ Arabinda Rajkhowa rules out holding direct peace talks with New Delhi unless the Government released some of their senior jailed leaders.
  • January 1: The Union Government extends the four-year-old cease-fire with the DHD by another year.
  • January 10: Chief Minister of Assam Tarun Gogoi accuses peace mediator Indira Goswami of hiding facts relating to ULFA’s links with Inter Services Intelligence (ISI) of Pakistan.
  • February 22: The Centre has extended the ceasefire with the Assam's Karbi Anglong-based militant outfit United People's Democratic Solidarity (UPDS) for another six months till July 31, 2008.
  • March 12: The NDFB refuses to submit the charter of demands as a precondition for initiating peace talks with the Union Government.
  • June 1: Union Government extends the suspension of operations against the NDFB for another six months.
  • June 12: The Union Government categorically states that talks with banned ULFA can only resume if the top leadership communicates directly with the Central Government and not through mediators.
  • July 9: Asom Lion Force, a new militant outfit, is reportedly formed by some youths belonging to all Northeastern states in Karbi Anglong district. Aniruddha Barphukan, a self-styled secretary of the outfit, in a statement said the group had been formed to "further strengthen" the liberation movement in the North East. Barphukan has demanded an immediate halt on all "occupational and allied activities" by the Government and called upon the people to boycott all Indian functions and honour their own culture.
  • August 1: The cease-fire agreement between the UPDS and Union Government has been extended for another six months, beginning August 1.
  • October 2: ULFA reiterates its willingness to sit for talks with the government, even in capital Dispur if necessary, provided its core demand of restoration of Assam’s sovereignty is discussed.
  • November 16: Local newspapers report of a plan by the Central Government to effect a crossover of all cadres belonging to NDFB in lieu of money, if the insurgent outfit shies away from the talks process.
  • November 20: The Central Government states that a rethink on the peace process will be done only if ULFA commander-in-chief Paresh Barua gives the guarantee of coming for talks himself.
  • December 8: Thirteen Members of Parliament belonging to the region urge Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh to hold immediate peace talks with the NDFB in view of a further extension of ceasefire.
  • December 30: Centre extends ceasefire with the DHD by another 6 months with effect from Jan1, 2008.

2006

  • January 16:Hindi-speaking villagers, under the banner of the Assam Bhojpuri Yuba Chhatra Parishad, seek protection of the State Government from the extortion drive by the NDFB militants who allegedly had distributed demand notes, ranging from Rupees 30,000 to Rupees 50,000, signed by a self-styled "collection-in-charge" Lt. D. Dethsrang, along the border of Nagaon and Karbi Anglong districts.
  • January 17: UPDS decides to drop its main demand for an autonomous state. It agrees to settle for additional powers to the existing autonomous council.
  • February 1: In the recent issue of the ULFA mouthpiece Freedom, the outfit makes it clear that it is not in favour of holding any secret talks with the Government of India. The outfit says that it is keen on holding talks at UN platform in front of the entire world.
  • February 7: In its second round of talks, the Union Government and ULFA-constituted PCG agree on a host of confidence building measures (CBM’s) to bring the insurgent outfit to the negotiation table.
  • February 7: The NDFB refuses to begin peace talks unless the Union Government provides information about the whereabouts of seven senior members missing during Operation All Clear in Bhutan in December 2003. NDFB 'commander-in-chief' Ranjan Daimary alias D.R. Nabla said that Delhi has to prove its sincerity by providing information on the seven leaders. The missing militants include the outfit’s 'publicity secretary' B. Erakdao, B. Habrang, B. Fwjoukhang, Jwkhrub, Derhasa, Onsula and Udla.
  • April 1: Prime Minister Manmohan Singh says the process initiated by the Union Government to restore peace in Assam would be expedited, but rules out talks with the ULFA on the "sovereignty" issue.
  • May 6: NDFB threatens to pull out of the peace process and resort to violence if the Union government fails to start talks by May 31.
  • May 18: The Union Government confirms that the outlawed ULFA has sent to the Oil and Natural Gas Corporation a demand note of Rupees Five billion. The Union Minister of State for Petroleum and Natural Gas, Dinsha Patel, said in the Parliament that there have been four disruptive incidents by the ULFA resulting in minor damage to the property of ONGC in the recent past.
  • May 27: The first round of parleys takes place between the Union Government and NDFB in New Delhi. Both sides agree to extend the ceasefire agreement.
  • June 7: The tripartite accord review meeting between the Union and Assam Governments and the Bodo Territorial Council is held in New Delhi.
  • June 16: A frontal organization of the ULFA, Assam Watch, is reportedly operating in the United Kingdom. Mukul Hazarika is the co-ordinator of the Assam Watch.
  • June 16: The International Federation of Journalists condemns the ULFA for issuing threats against Assam's media persons and supports the subsequent calls made by the latter for their rights to freedom of expression.
  • July 1: ULFA expresses its willingness to hold direct talks with the Union Government at the earliest.
  • July 3: ULFA serve an extortion note of Rupees 150 milion to the Regional Director of the Reserve Bank of India in Guwahati.
  • July 19: Union Government asks ULFA to establish direct contact with it and push the peace process forward.
  • August 2: The ULFA-backed People's Consultative Group (PCG) threatens to pull out of negotiations with the Union Government in the wake of recent killing of several ULFA cadres by the SFs in the State.
  • August 2: The NDFB threatened to pull out of the cease-fire with the Union Government, accusing SFs of targeting its cadres without any provocation.
  • August 3: National Security Adviser M. K. Narayanan informed the peace interlocutor Indira Goswami that the Union Government is seeking a formal letter from ULFA for the release of its five arrested leaders as well as for direct peace talks.
  • August 13: Government declares ceasefire. ULFA responds five days later by announcing a “cessation of hostilities”.
  • August 23: Ceasefire by Centre with ULFA extended
  • August 23: Another round of negotiations is held between Union Government and ULFA constituted-PCG to prepare modalities for initiation of direct talks with ULFA.
  • August 28: Centre reviews state security scene. It is learnt that the army has expressed its reservations against further extension of suspension of operations if the ULFA did not respond to Centre’s condition for direct talks by the stipulated time. The Centre has asked ULFA to name its team of negotiators suggest a time frame and a written communication confirming that they were coming for negations.
  • September 1: The railway construction work between Lumding and Silchar through North Cachar Hills was affected, as contractors decide to suspend construction work due to extortion threat by militant outfits.
  • September 5: Suspension of counter-insurgency operations against ULFA extended till September 15.
  • September 5: National Security Adviser M. K. Narayanan denies any step on part of the Union Government to unilaterally release five arrested ULFA leaders.
  • September 7: Suspension of Army operations against ULFA expires.
  • September 11: UPDS decides to suspend peace talks with the Union Government, but would continue with the ceasefire agreement.
  • September 24: The Government of India calls off suspension of operations against ULFA, 41 days after unilaterally announcing truce, citing gross violation of the informal pact. Army resumes anti-ULFA operations.
  • September 27: The ULFA-constituted PCG pulls out from the peace process. Its spokesperson Arup Borbora accuses the Union Government of being insincere.
  • October 3: ULFA endorses PCG decision to pull out of the negotiations with the Union Government, but refuses to disband the PCG.
  • October 12: The Union Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) submits to Myanmar's Government a list of 15 militant camps run on its soil by the outfits, including ULFA.
  • October 31: Centre (NSA) invites Reboti Phukan to Delhi in connection with ULFA peace talks.
  • November 15: The ULFA demands protection of the rights of non-Bodo people in the Bodoland Territorial Council administered areas. The outfit referred to allegations about "a certain section" of the people extorting money from "non-Bodo indigenous people" residing in the Bodoland areas.
  • November 16: Peace facilitator and PCG member Indira Goswami withdraws from the peace process.
  • November 26: NDFB rules out the issue of sovereignty as a precondition to the proposed peace talks with the Centre but maintaining that it should be the “core issue” of the talks. The outfit’s general secretary B Swamkhwr states that “a further show of insincerity by the Center may end the ongoing truce.”
  • November 27: A delegation of 12 political parties (NCP, PLP, AGP(P), AUDF, RSP, SUCI, Jatiya Aikya Mancha, RCPI, CPI(ML), JaNATA Dal (S), Janata Dal (U), Samajwadi Party, etc.) urges both the Centre and the ULFA not to impose any pre-condition for talks.
  • November 29: Union Governmnet extends ceasefire agreement with NDFB for a further period of six months with effect from December 1, 2006 .
  • December 1: ULFA asks Dispur to rechristen the 33 rd National Games as “Assam Sports Festival” if it wanted the event to go ahead as planned.
  • December 2: ULFA asks the Union Government to give a written commitment that the issue of Assam’s ‘sovereignty’ will be discussed in the negotiations.
  • December 6: Assam Government appeals to the ULFA to withdraw its call for sportspersons to stay away from the forthcoming National Games.
  • December 24: The ULFA-backed PCG rejects Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s offer of "safe passage" to top ULFA leaders as a ‘political gimmick’.
  • December 28: The Union Home Secretary V.K. Duggal asks ULFA leaders to make a formal request to the Union Government for talks to restore peace in Assam.

 

2005

  • January 9: An emissary sent by Assam government establishes contact with NDFB chairman Ranjan Daimary in Bangladesh and discusses issues pertaining to the proposed peace talks.
  • January 19: Tripartite talks are held between a five-member delegation of the UPDS, the officials of MHA and Assam Government in New Delhi. The talks remain inconclusive.
  • February 27: NDFB chairman Ranjan Daimary sets a deadline of April 15 for the Union Government to respond to the insurgent group’s unilateral ceasefire .
  • April 15: NDFB declares extension of cease-fire with the Government for a further period of six-months.
  • May 25: A tripartite ceasefire agreement, effective from June 1 for a period of one year, is signed between the NDFB, Union Government and Government of Assam.
  • May 25: Union Government sends a formal letter to ULFA through mediator Indira Goswami, inviting the insurgent group for peace talks.
  • May 30: ULFA demands release of four of the insurgent group’s leaders before commencement of talks with the Union Government.
  • June 30: A letter drafted by ULFA Chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa and addressed to National Security Advisor on the question of peace talks is sent to the Prime Minister’s Office.
  • July 20: The cease-fire agreement between the Union Government and UPDS is extended for another year. Agreement is signed at the BSF sector headquarters at Patgaon in Guwahati.
  • August 30: Operation Red Rose in Arunachal and Operation Balwan in Dibru-Saikhowa are launched by the Army.
  • September 7: ULFA names a ten member people's consultative group (PCG) headed by litterateur Indira Goswami to negotiate with the Union Government. Prominent among them are senior journalists Ajit Bhuyan & Hyder Hussain, eminent lawyer Arup Borbora, advisor of MASS Lachit Bordoloi and AJYCP leader Dilip Patgiri.
  • September 14: A new party headed by Prafulla Kumar Mahanta was born, named ‘Asom Gana Parishad (Progressive)’. A 79-member committee including 48 executive members has been formed.
  • October 26: A round of negotiations takes place between Union Government and the ULFA-constituted People’s Consultative Group (PCG) in New Delhi.

 

2004

  • January 2: Indian Army Chief General N C Vij announces in Guwahati that Bhutanese army operations succeeded in depleting the strength of ULFA insurgents by about 650.
  • January 4: ULFA Chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa labels Bhutanese Prime Minister Lyonpo Jigmi Thinley a puppet at the hands of Indian authorities for launching flush-out operations against the insurgents. Also warns Bhutan of dire consequences.
  • March 5: The newly formed Mising Ganatantrik Morcha has submitted a memorandum to Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi demanding inclusion of the Mising Autonomous Council under the provisions of the Sixth Schedule of the Constitution.
  • M ay 16: UPDS (anti-talks) faction rechristens itself as the Karbi Longri North Cachar Hills Liberation Front ( KLNLF).
  • June 24: Jewel Garlossa, the president of DHD is ousted from the insurgent outfit for his strong stand against peace talks. The military wing chief Pranab Nunisa becomes the president. Garlossa decides to continue with subversive activities and forms the Black Widow.
  • July 30: The Union Government extends its cease-fire with the UPDS for another year.
  • October 8: NDFB declares a unilateral ceasefire from October 15 for a period of six months. This is in response to the Assam government’s offer for talks.
  • December 7: Union government invites ULFA for unconditional talks. The letter of invitation is handed over by the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) to peace mediator and noted Assamese littérateur Indira Goswami.
  • December 9: ULFA rejects the invitation for peace talks and says that PMO invitation letter is self-contradictory and confusing.
  • December 28: In a tripartite meeting between DHD, Union Government and Government of Assam, cease-fire agreement with DHD is extended till the end of 2005. The meeting is held in Guwahati.

 

2003

  • February 3: State Cabinet meeting in Guwahati endorse decision to reserve 30 seats for Bodo community and five for non-Bodos and five more to be left open for contest in the proposed 40-member Bodoland Territorial Council (BTC).
  • February 10: BLT leaders sign agreement with Union and State Governments approving formation of the BTC in Bodo dominated areas of Assam.
  • March 9: According to reports, troops of the Red Horns Division of the Army launches Operation Shamsheer, jointly with the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), Assam Police and Meghalaya Police to counter militancy on the Assam-Meghalaya border.
  • May 27: State Government issues notification to dissolve the Bodoland Autonomous Council (BAC).
  • June 27: Cease-fire with DHD in operation since January 1, 2003 extended for another six months, beyond June 30.
  • August 1: BTC bill tabled in Lok Sabha
  • August 6: Lok Sabha passes the BTC bill.
  • September 8: President APJ Abdul Kalam assents to the bill for amendment in the Sixth Schedule of the Constitution and clears the way for formation of BTC.BLT reiterates its commitment of abjuring violence and returning to the mainstream.
  • December 6: At a surrender ceremony held in Kokrajhar, 2641 BLT insurgents led by its chairman Hagrama Basumatary lay down arms. The BLT decides to disband itself completely.
  • December 7: A 12-member interim executive council of the BTC is administered oath of office in Kokrajhar.
  • December 15: The Royal Bhutan Army (RBA) launches massive flush-out operations against ULFA insurgents taking shelter in jungles inside Bhutanese territory.
  • December 15: NDFB camps targeted during operations by The Royal Bhutan Army (RBA) in the jungles of southern Bhutan.
  • December 22: The Lok Sabha (Lower House of Parliament) approves an amendment to add the Bodo language in the Eighth Schedule of the Indian Constitution.
  • December 22: Bhutan Government claims to have recovered more than 700 assorted weapons from the terrorist camps in the ongoing military operations.
  • December 23: Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi, in a statement in Guwahati, offers general amnesty to all militants surrendering before January 31, 2004.
  • December 26:ULFA 'commander-in-chief' Paresh Baruah, in an interview to a Guwahati based newspaper, offers conditional dialogue with the Union Government on the issue of Assam's sovereignty through a neutral third party mediator.
  • December 27: Jewel Garlosa, chief of the DHD, in a press statement, appeals to insurgent outfits in the northeastern region to come forward for negotiations.
  • December 27: NDFB chairman Ranjan Daimary rejects the amnesty offer of Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi.
  • December 28: I D Swami, Union Minister of State of Home Affairs, in a statement in New Delhi rejects ULFA's offer of conditional dialogue through a neutral mediator.
  • December 29: Cease-fire between the DHD and Union Government is extended by one year from January 1, 2004.
  • December 30: Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi, in a statement in Guwahati, terms the ULFA 'commander-in-chief' Paresh Barua as a stumbling block in the dialogue process with the outfit.

2002

  • January 1: Assam government offers a 30-day safe passage to ULFA and National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) insurgents.
  • February 7: The Adivasi Cobra Force (ACF) extends its unilateral cease-fire, announced on September 15, 2001.
  • March 23 & 24: A tripartite meeting takes place between the BLT, Assam government and Union government. Decision taken to allow the Assam government to formulate modalities for amendment of the Sixth Schedule of the Indian constitution.
  • May 23: KLNLF is formed as a result of a split in the UPDS. However, the outfit is known as UPDS (anti-talks faction) at the time.
  • May 23: UPDS, led by its general secretary Horensing Bey, signs ‘cease hostilities' agreement with the Union Government for a period of one year.
  • May 23: A split takes place in UPDS. The anti-talks faction decides to continue its armed insurgency.
  • July 4: Formal agreement to create the Bodoland Territorial Council reached at a tripartite meeting, in New Delhi, between the Assam government, the Union government and Bodo groups. Decision taken to form a joint expert committee of Sate and Union governments to suggest changes in the Sixth Schedule of the Indian Constitution .
  • September 24: A Bangladesh court convicts general secretary of ULFA Anup Chetia along with two of his accomplices for illegal possession of a satellite phone and sends them to seven years in jail.
  • November 5: NDFB chief Ranjan Daimary declares that the insurgent group has no hesitation in sitting for talks with the Union Government if the agenda includes historical rights and right to self-determination of the Bodo people.
  • December 30: DHD announces a unilateral ceasefire with effect from January 1, 2003 for a period of six months.

 

2001

  • August 17: ULFA reiterates its earlier pre-conditions for a peace dialogue. The outfit wants talks to be held outside India under the supervision of United Nations representatives.
  • September 15: Union government decides to extend cease-fire with the BLT till January 21, 2002 .
  • December 7: Xatra Mahasabha, a Vaishnavite religious group offers to mediate between the ULFA and Union government.
  • December 15: Publicity Secretary of the NDFB B Irakdao lays down conditions for peace talks with the Union government.
  • December 16: Mizoram Chief Minister Zoramthanga offers to mediate between the government and ULFA.

 

2000

  • March 14: Assam Chief Minister Prafulla Kumar Mahanta accuses Pakistan's High Commissioner in Bangladesh of playing a crucial role in sending ULFA insurgents to Pakistan for arms training.
  • March 15: Union Government decides to halt operations against BLT as the insurgent outfit agrees to abide by the Indian constitution.
  • March 29: Union government and BLT arrive at an agreement on setting up a Joint Monitoring Group to oversee the ceasefire.
  • September 12: The ceasefire agreement between Union government and BLT is further extended by one year.

 

1999

  • March: The United People’s Democratic Solidarity (UPDS) is formed with the merger of two insurgent groups in Assam's Karbi Anglong district- the Karbi National Volunteers (KNV) and Karbi People’s Front (KPF).
  • April 17: Army suspends operations against ULFA during Bihu festival.
  • September 1: Union government invites BLT for peace negotiations to resolve the Bodo problem.

 

1998

  • January 22: Prime Minister I K Gujral announces Union Government’s decision to bear all costs of counter-insurgency operations in Assam, Nagaland, Punjab and Jammu and Kashmir.

 

1997

  • January 20: A three-tier unified command structure involving the army, police and paramilitary forces is formed to effectively co-ordinate the functioning of security agencies engaged in counter-insurgency operations in Assam.
  • July 15: ULFA leadership attends the Unrepresented Nation People’s Organisation (UNPO) meeting in London.
  • October 3: Union government imposes a ban of two years on the BLT.
  • December 7: ULFA expresses willingness for talks with Central Government and lays down conditions. The insurgent outfit wants talks to be held in a third country in the presence of United Nations representatives.

 

1996

  • Dima Halim Daogah (DHD) is founded by Jewel Garlossa. DHD is an offshoot of the erstwhile Dimasa National Security Force (DNSF), which had surrendered en masse in 1995. However, Garlossa had refused to surrender at the time.
  • April 25: ULFA militants kill a local Congress (I) leader and four others near Margherita town, Tinsukia district.
  • April 28: Lt. Col. Devendra Tyagi shot dead by ULFA insurgents in the Kamakhya temple, Guwahati.
  • May 18: ULFA insurgents gun down Ravi Kant Singh, Superitendent of Police (SP), Tinsukia district.
  • May 23: Violent clashes between Bodo insurgents and Santhals leave more than 80 people dead and over 100,000 homeless in Kokrajhar and Bongaigaon districts.
  • June 18: Bodo Liberation Tiger Force (BLTF) is established under the leadership of Prem Singh Brahma.
  • July 30: All Bodo Students Union (ABSU) President Sumbla Basumatary killed by suspected Bodo militants.
  • August 19: ULFA insurgents kill 13 security force personnel in three separate attacks. In another incident, Bodo militants kill 10 people.
  • November 21: Bodo militants gun down 13 people in two separate incidents.

 

1995

  • April – May: Indian and Myanmarese armed forces jointly launch Operation Golden Bird.
  • August 3: ULFA militants kill eight security force personnel in an ambush in Kamrup district.
  • November 20: Central government extends ban on two insurgent organisations, ULFA and BSF.
  • November 23: Five security force personnel and their civilian driver killed in an ambush laid jointly by ULFA and BSF insurgents.


1994

  • May 27 - July 27: Bodo insurgents carry out large-scale attacks on non-Bodos, leaving more than 100 people dead and over 60,000 homeless.
  • June 29: Security forces arrest Pradip Gogoi, the Vice-chairman of ULFA
  • November 10: 17 ULFA insurgents surrender in the presence of the Chief Minister, Hiteswar Saikia.
  • November 20: Central government extends ban on two insurgent organisations, ULFA and BSF.
  • November 25: The Bodo Security Force rechristens itself as National Democratic Front of Boroland ( NDFB).

 

1993

  • February 20: Memorandum of Settlement signed between the Government of India, the Government of Assam and Bodo leaders creating a 40–member Bodoland Autonomous Council (BAC) and a Bodo Executive Council (BEC).

 

1992

  • January 7: Three unidentified ULFA mediators accompany Assam Chief Minister Hiteshwar Saikia to New Delhi. They meet Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao to discuss modalities for negotiations.
  • January 12: First round of preliminary talks take place between Central government and a five-member ULFA delegation in New Delhi. Prime Minister and Home Minister are also present.
  • January 14: Government of Assam declares suspension of Operation Rhino. ULFA leadership evinces keen interest in a political dialogue with the government.
  • March 31: Eighteen senior leaders of ULFA surrender in Dispur, the capital of Assam and express firm faith in solving the insurgency problem through dialogue. They include Munin Nobis, Kalpajyoti Neog, Siddhartha Phukan, Amar Miri Handique and Ramesh Saikia.
  • April 1: ULFA top leadership announces expulsion of all surrendered members from the outfit and criticize the peace dialogue with the state government.
  • November 21: 61 people die in Guwahati and Barpeta, in three bomb explosions, allegedly caused by BSF militants.
  • November 23: Union Government imposes ban on NDFB (Bodo Security Force).

 

1991

  • April 20: Operation Bajrang called off. Arrest of 209 hardcore insurgents with sophisticated arms and recovery of cash worth Rs. 48 million during the operation is reported by the government.
  • July 1: ULFA resumes insurgent activities, kidnaps 14 people, including an engineer, a national of (the erstwhile) Soviet Union.
  • September 15: The Indian Army launches Rhino, the second major operation against the ULFA.

 

1990

  • May 9: ULFA insurgents kill Surendra Paul, a leading tea planter, causing many tea estate managers to flee the State.
  • November 28: Assam comes under President’s rule. The entire state declared a "disturbed area" and ULFA banned under the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, 1967. Operation Bajrang is launched and army asked to clamp down on the insurgents vigorously.

 

1986

  • October 3: The National Democratic Front of Bodoland ( NDFB) is founded under the leadership of Ranjan Daimary. The insurgent outfit is known as Bodo Security Force (BdSF) at the time.

 

1985

  • August 15: Assam Accord signed. The Accord says that all foreigners who entered Assam on or after March 25, 1971, are to be detected and deported.

 

1980

  • March 28: Save Cachar and N.C Hills districts, the whole of Assam is declared a disturbed area and brought under the Assam Disturbed Areas Act, 1955. Army is called in to maintain law & order.
  • April 6: Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, 1958 promulgated in Assam.
  • March 28: Anti-foreigners movement takes a violent turn and the army is deployed to restore law and order.
  • April 6: The entire State, with the exception of Cachar and North Cachar Hills districts, declared as disturbed area and brought under the Assam Disturbed Area Act, 1955, and the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, 1958.

 

1979

  • April 7: United Liberation Front of Asom ( ULFA) was founded.
  • July: All Assam Students Union (AASU) and All Assam Gana Sangram Parishad (AAGSP) launched anti-foreigners movement.
  • November: Anti-foreigners movement intensifies.
  • December: Assam was brought under President’s rule.

 

1967

 

  • All Bodo Students Union (ABSU) was founded to fight for better social, economic and political conditions for the Bodos.

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